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Multiflexing its muscles
Robert H. Boyle
October 20, 1980
Completely multiple and totally flexible, Harvard has run up a 4-0 record using the innovative and confusing formations of its coach and philosopher, Joe Restic
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October 20, 1980

Multiflexing Its Muscles

Completely multiple and totally flexible, Harvard has run up a 4-0 record using the innovative and confusing formations of its coach and philosopher, Joe Restic

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The Harvard players believe him. "Every week we have new wrinkles," says Brian Buckley, a former high school All-America quarterback who was sought by Arizona State and Nebraska. "One of the reasons I wanted to come to Harvard was the wide-open offense. It's a place where a quarterback can learn. There's no place that can compete when it comes to excitement and imagination of play. We go into the game thinking we're going to score and going to win. There's no telling what he [Restic] could do in the pros."

If the multiflex is so great, how come Harvard can lose? While Restic's career record at Harvard is 51-32-2, very respectable, it is hardly perfect. He believes—and so do his players—that a defeat is caused by player fallibility, not by the multiflex. "The system is wonderful," says Charlie Davidson, a celebrated Cambridge sports savant. "The more it fails, the more it proves itself right. It's always pilot error."

Restic agrees. "If you're talking about the pilot, you're talking about the quarterback," he says. "The plane is fine, and I hope the guy looking after the plane is fine, too."

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