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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
Edited by Gay Flood
May 25, 1981
THREE-SPORT MANSir:As Kenny Moore says in his excellent article The Three-Sport Man: Hail and Farewell (May 11), one is saddened that the American collegiate sports system as it exists today makes Dan Jones an exception. Fortunately, there are still colleges like Lewis and Clark where the love of athletics is recognized for what it is: a joyful contribution to the development of well-rounded, healthy adults. Jones is obviously having a ball in an environment that accepts him for what he is: an intelligent young man who loves sports.
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May 25, 1981

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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THREE-SPORT MAN
Sir:
As Kenny Moore says in his excellent article The Three-Sport Man: Hail and Farewell (May 11), one is saddened that the American collegiate sports system as it exists today makes Dan Jones an exception. Fortunately, there are still colleges like Lewis and Clark where the love of athletics is recognized for what it is: a joyful contribution to the development of well-rounded, healthy adults. Jones is obviously having a ball in an environment that accepts him for what he is: an intelligent young man who loves sports.

A copy of the article should be sent to every college athletic director in the country.
WILLIAM C. COLE
San Clemente, Calif.

Sir:
As I read Kenny Moore's fine article on three-sport college men, I remembered something I gleaned from Goethe as an undergraduate. He said of modern culture: "Specialists without spirit, sensualists without heart; this nullity imagines that it has attained a level of civilization never before achieved."

Hats off to Moore for recognizing the alarming gravitation of higher education in this country toward such a state of affairs.
PAUL A. COLBURN
Marlborough, Conn.

Sir:
I'm a ninth-grader getting ready to attend high school this fall. Having played football, basketball and baseball in junior high, I had been wondering which one or two of those sports I could pursue in high school and still be able to maintain my grades. Your article has helped me make up my mind: I'm going to continue playing all three. Dan Jones is an outstanding example for kids in my position.
SCOTT DODGE
Ogden, Utah

Sir:
Your survey failed to turn up Carleton College sophomore Bobby Taylor, who has lettered in four sports in the span of two years. Taylor has lettered twice in football and once each in basketball, track and baseball. He's a pro prospect in football and, at 6'3" and 175 pounds, he sounds very much like Dan Jones. Keep an eye on him in 1982-83. If the three-sport man is a rarity, the four-sport star like Taylor is a dinosaur. To play even two sports here, with our rigorous academic schedule, is quite an accomplishment.
BOB SULLIVAN
Head Baseball and Football Coach
Carleton College
Northfield, Minn.

Sir:
Paul R. Belanger of Colby College, who graduates this spring, has participated in football, basketball and baseball during each of his four years at Colby and has excelled to such a degree that pro baseball and football scouts have looked at him. Belanger was a quarterback and punter and, at times, a wide receiver; a basketball guard; and a baseball infielder-outfielder with remarkable power and speed, not to mention a batting average of .401 this season and .356 for his career.
PAUL J. MICHAUD
Sanford, Maine

Sir:
Wheaton College has its own-master of the "hallowed trinity." Steve Thonn, a sophomore, decided to play football this year after sitting out his freshman season. He led the team in receptions and in yards receiving. He also played point guard as a reserve on the basketball team, and he starts in the outfield on the baseball team. As a freshman, Steve was tied for the team lead in home runs and led in stolen bases while batting .311 and making no errors in the outfield.
BRIAN BAIRD
KURT MADSEN
TOM THORNTON
Wheaton, Ill.

Sir:
Henry Milligan of Princeton has combined football, wrestling and baseball. Milligan is a three-year starter in football (defensive back) and baseball (third base and shortstop), and is also an All-America wrestler in the 190-pound division. As a junior, Milligan placed in the top 12 in the NCAA Division I heavyweight wrestling championships. Not bad for a guy of 188 pounds. Henry has earned a total of 10 letters.
JIM PECK
Princeton, N.J.

Sir:
Bobby Howe, a freshman at Hamilton College, is also a three-sport man. He played varsity soccer this past fall. Then, partly because of an overlap of seasons and a late start on the ice, he played junior-varsity hockey until the second half of the season, when he began playing regularly on the varsity team, participating in the ECAC hockey tournament in March. Bobby traded hockey stick for lacrosse stick this spring and was a starting attack-man and the team's second-leading scorer. These are rugged contact sports and must put a heavy toll on an athlete who is all of 5'5" and 142 pounds after a heavy meal!
CHUCK VERNON
Windsor, Conn.

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