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HIS EYES HAVE SEEN THE GLORY
John Underwood
July 27, 1981
But that will remain an old story unless Miami Coach Don Shula transcends front-office foibles and player losses
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July 27, 1981

His Eyes Have Seen The Glory

But that will remain an old story unless Miami Coach Don Shula transcends front-office foibles and player losses

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Meanwhile, what is Shula doing? Why, he is out on the practice field, hard at work, of course. Getting ready to win again. Being positive. Being Shula. He says he has high hopes for some of the Dolphins' recent acquisitions. That Jon Geisler and Eric Laakso have helped solidify the offensive line. That Alabama All-America Don McNeal is already a star in the secondary. That young Place-kicker Uwe von Schamann has already proved himself by winning three games for Miami last year.

And, of course, there is the 6'3", 205-pound Woodley, rugged and quick, running the offense. And running the ball, too. That's a new twist that Shula is having fun with—mainly in tormenting rival teams with the prospect of having to defend against an option offense. Woodley averaged 3.9 yards on 55 carries in 1980. Shula will let him run again, at least some of the time.

Shula says he likes Miami. He enjoys the sun. He likes to play tennis and golf year-round ("I shot an 84 the other day"). Two of his five kids are still in school there. He makes local commercials and is a popular television host. He plans to stay a while.

As Foley says, "There are more question marks than ever, but it's an exciting time. And that's when Shoes is at his best."

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