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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
Edited by Gay Flood
August 17, 1981
HANNAH & CO. Sir:Once again Paul Zimmerman has shown that he has few—if any—equals when it comes to writing about pro football. The extent of his knowledge and research was very evident in his article on John Hannah (John Hannah Doesn't Fiddle Around, Aug. 3). I consider myself lucky to have seen the likes of Al Wistert, Bob St. Clair. Dick Stanfel, etc. I only wish younger pro football fans could have seen them in order to have some meaningful yardstick by which to measure Hannah's greatness as an offensive lineman.JIM CAMPBELLResearch EditorNational Football League Properties, Inc.Los Angeles
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August 17, 1981

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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HANNAH & CO.
Sir:
Once again Paul Zimmerman has shown that he has few—if any—equals when it comes to writing about pro football. The extent of his knowledge and research was very evident in his article on John Hannah (John Hannah Doesn't Fiddle Around, Aug. 3). I consider myself lucky to have seen the likes of Al Wistert, Bob St. Clair. Dick Stanfel, etc. I only wish younger pro football fans could have seen them in order to have some meaningful yardstick by which to measure Hannah's greatness as an offensive lineman.
JIM CAMPBELL
Research Editor
National Football League Properties, Inc.
Los Angeles

Sir:
A guard on the cover. I love it! If John Hannah can do for the Patriots this year what he's done in the past, skeptics will believe he's "the best offensive lineman of all time."
ROY MAINVILLE
Holyoke, Mass.

Sir:
It is presumptuous and asinine of you to name a "best offensive lineman of all time." It's presumptuous because you simply can't single out one man from the thousands who have played in different times, under different rules and in the different positions of tackle, guard and center. It's asinine because you didn't pick Bob Brown as the best.
SAM SIMON
Santa Monica, Calif.

Sir:
John Hannah as the best offensive lineman of all time? Not until he beats out Dan Dierdorf of the Cardinals.
ANDY PETRAGLIA
Cahokia, Ill.

Sir:
Jack Stroud, the great Giant guard of the '50s and '60s, was one of the best offensive linemen of all time. And Bob Brown was in a class by himself. I can remember Brown playing shortly after knee surgery in 1971. He had to limp to the line of scrimmage and still was good. When healthy he was the most devastating player of his era.
STEVE BOGNER
River Vale, N.J.

Sir:
My impression after reading your article on Houston's Bob Young (Still Going Strong. Nov. 17) was that he surely must be the best offensive guard in history. You quoted Jim Hanifan, head coach of the Cards, as saying, "There is absolutely no question in my mind that he's the greatest offensive guard ever to play the game."
JEFF NURENBERG
Pewamo, Mich.

Sir:
Other than Jerry Kramer, there has never been a better pulling guard than Miami's Larry Little. He had grace, agility and speed as he opened great holes for the likes of Larry Csonka and Mercury Morris. If ever there was a consummate offensive lineman, Larry Little was it.
RANDOLPH BRACY JR.
Webster, N.Y.

Sir:
Ron Yary, a 6'6", 255-pound USC All-America, is in his 14th season with the Minnesota Vikings. He has played in seven Pro Bowl games, is rarely injured, always stays in shape and just keeps on firing out or blocking down and destroying the defense.
CHUCK COULTER
Minneapolis

Sir:
Pittsburgh's Jon Kolb once handled Lyle Alzado, Elvin Bethea and Harvey Martin in successive playoff games. This should have earned Kolb at least an honorable mention.
SCOTT CLEAVER
Albion, Pa.

MOORE ON CAULKINS
Sir:
If I read nothing else in your magazine, I would maintain my subscription so I wouldn't miss a single article by Kenny Moore. Whatever the assignment, Moore brings to it a poet's grace. His subjects, sensing the presence of a fellow athlete who understands the meaning of training from firsthand experience, reveal themselves in ways ordinary journalists are rarely able to grasp.

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