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BASEBALL
Herm Weiskopf
October 12, 1981
This was the year in which the national pastime became the national part-time, victim of a seven-week strike that split the season into ill-conceived Parts I and II. No team led its division for both halves, though San Diego and Toronto finished last twice. Most pained were the Reds, whose combined 66-42 record was the majors' best, and the Cardinals, whose 59-43 would have won the National League East. Neither even made it to the mini-playoffs. Much of the gloss was lost from individual statistics, too. Prorating their figures over a full season, Mike Schmidt of the Phillies would have had 47 homers and 138 RBIs, Fernando Valenzuela of the Dodgers would have had a rookie-record 265 strikeouts, Rollie Fingers of the Brewers would have set an alltime mark with 42 saves and rookie Tim Raines of the Expos would have had 107 stolen bases, the second-highest total ever.
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October 12, 1981

Baseball

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THE INDIVIDUAL CHAMPIONS


AMERICAN LEAGUE

NATIONAL LEAGUE

BATTING

Average

Lansford, Bos.

.336

Madlock, Pitt.

.341

Runs

Henderson, Oak.

89

Schmidt, Phil.

78

RBIs

Murray, Balt.

78

Schmidt, Phil.

91

Hits

Henderson, Oak.

135

Rose, Phil.

140

Homers

Grich, Cal.
Armas, Oak.
Murray, Balt.
Evans, Bos.

22
22
22
22

Schmidt, Phil.

31

Steals

Henderson, Oak.

56

Raines, Mont.

71

PITCHING

Wins

Vuckovich, Mil.
Morris, Det.
D. Martinez, Balt.
McCatty, Oak.

14
14
14
14

Seaver, Cin.

14

ERA

McCatty, Oak.

2.32

Ryan, Hous.

1.69

Strikeouts

Barker, Clev.

127

Valenzuela, L.A.

180

Saves

Fingers, Mil.

28

Sutter, St.L.

25

This was the year in which the national pastime became the national part-time, victim of a seven-week strike that split the season into ill-conceived Parts I and II. No team led its division for both halves, though San Diego and Toronto finished last twice. Most pained were the Reds, whose combined 66-42 record was the majors' best, and the Cardinals, whose 59-43 would have won the National League East. Neither even made it to the mini-playoffs. Much of the gloss was lost from individual statistics, too. Prorating their figures over a full season, Mike Schmidt of the Phillies would have had 47 homers and 138 RBIs, Fernando Valenzuela of the Dodgers would have had a rookie-record 265 strikeouts, Rollie Fingers of the Brewers would have set an alltime mark with 42 saves and rookie Tim Raines of the Expos would have had 107 stolen bases, the second-highest total ever.

AMERICAN LEAGUE WEST

Oakland (4-1) started the season with 11 wins and was 18-3 for April, both major league marks. Although assured a postseason berth, the Royals (4-2) still had to play a makeup doubleheader with Cleveland Monday—and win one game to finish on top in Part II.

"I get mad sometimes because it seems the motto around here is: 'Winning is great, but losing's not so bad, either,' " said Jim Sundberg of the Rangers (5-1). Texas came in third with the help of Charlie Hough, a reliever for years, who won four starts in three weeks.

The Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome will be home for the Twins (1-5) next year. Doug Corbett had 17 saves, and rookie Dave Engle a 15-game hitting streak.

Chicago (3-3), with newly acquired hitters who pounded the ball, led the West on May 30. But then the sluggers turned sluggish.

A fifth-place in Part II was the highest the five-year-old Mariners (2-4) have ever finished. Tom Paciorek hit .326 and Richie Zisk .311.

Bobby Grich of the Angels (3-3) recovered from a broken hand suffered on June 6 to tie for the league homer title with 22. It was only the fourth time a second baseman has led a league in home runs. The last in the NL was Rogers Hornsby in 1925 (39 homers) and the last in the AL was Nap Lajoie in 1901 (13).

AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST

Money, money, money. Reggie Jackson of the Yankees (1-4), who this season became a second-class millionaire in comparison with Dave Winfield, spent quite a bit of time in recent weeks scooping up coins and bills tossed to him by fans participating in a bizarre fad. After one game he collected $82.56 in rightfield. As for Winfield, he earned roughly $9,000 a game while batting .294.

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