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A Last Hurrah For Los Angeles
Ron Fimrite
November 09, 1981
For some Dodgers, there may not be much time left to enjoy their World Series victory over New York
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November 09, 1981

A Last Hurrah For Los Angeles

For some Dodgers, there may not be much time left to enjoy their World Series victory over New York

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That was the secondary theme played at the victory party, and Campanis, the man with the authority to shake and break, was right there, patting backs, passing along congratulations, smiling benignly, a Godfather. Campanis both countered and encouraged speculation with some Dodger Blue homilies: "We don't make changes, the players make changes...." "Competition from within is the Dodger way...." "Complacency is anathema...." "If you stand still, they'll pass you...." "We have never been a trading ball club...." "You replace loose bricks, you don't tear down the house." He's fond of telling about an architect friend who, when someone expressed admiration for the architect's handsome house, embarked on a lengthy recitation of what was wrong with it and what was missing from it. The Dodgers will replace some loose bricks here and there, Campanis said during the party. "Fortunately, we have a reservoir of young talent," he said. "Eventually, they will be used. When, I don't know. These decisions will be made at Vero Beach in spring training." One method of reconstruction that will almost certainly be eschewed is the free-agent market, where the Dodgers came up empty-handed recently with Don Stanhouse, who didn't pitch this year, and Dave Goltz, who won only two games. The market, says Campanis, "has left us with a bad taste."

It was a swell party the Dodgers threw for the players. Old Brooklyn hero Roy Campanella told everyone how proud he was of them. "Fellas, there's nothing like playing on a winner," he said. For laughs, a belly dancer was turned loose to bedevil Lasorda. And as the afternoon wore on, the sun, which had shone brilliantly on the green field below, dropped behind the stadium rim so that there were only shadows outside. There were shadows inside as well. For many of the Dodgers, their moment in the sun will be all too brief. As Campanis said that afternoon, quoting the Bard, "Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown."

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