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SCORECARD
Edited by Jerry Kirshenbaum
January 18, 1982
TWO CASES OF INTEGRITY
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January 18, 1982

Scorecard

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WHAT ABOUT THE LAUGH TRACK?

You've no doubt heard people express the fear that sports events will one day be held in oversized TV studios instead of before live, paying audiences. Well, that prospect may be closer at hand than you think. Consider the deal the USA Network, a cable outfit, has just completed to telecast a taped replay of the Continental Basketball Association's All-Star Game (8 p.m. E.S.T., Feb. 1). The USA Network's programming reaches 9.2 million homes containing 25 million viewers, and it's possible that as many as one million of those folks may tune in to the CBA game. In comparison, total live attendance during the 36-year history of the CBA and its predecessor, the Eastern League, has probably been no more than 2.5 million. A euphoric Jim Drucker, the CBA commissioner, says, "Do you realize that if our All-Star Game reached even 10 percent of the potential audience, we'd be seen by more people in one night than in all our games since we began playing in 1946?"

The game, itself, incidentally, will be played at 2 p.m. on Jan. 30 in the Byrne Arena in East Rutherford, N.J. The seating capacity is 20,149, but it won't matter, financially, how many spectators show up. As one would expect of such a studio production, admission is free.

BUT THEY CAN COUNT TO NO. 1

After Georgia won college football's national championship a year ago, we recounted, under the same headline that appears above, a joke that fans of rival Georgia Tech were telling (SCORECARD, Jan. 12, 1981). The story concerned a talking computer that asked people their occupations and IQs. To a brainy lawyer, the computer would, by way of reply, rattle off a summary of the latest Supreme Court decisions, while a stockbroker would be given up-to-the-minute market quotations. Then there was the fellow who, when asked his occupation and IQ, haltingly answered, "Unemployed and 46." Whereupon the computer said, "How 'bout them Dawgs?"

You didn't expect Clemson, which succeeded Georgia as the No. 1 team, to be spared similar treatment, did you? No way. So here's one that's currently making the rounds among followers of cross-state rival South Carolina:

Do you know what the "n" in Clemson stands for?

No, what?

Knowledge.

THE BOWL SWEEPSTAKES

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