SI Vault
 
Winning With Cold Efficiency
Ron Fimrite
January 18, 1982
Johnny, how cold was it? It was so-o-o-o cold that.... Well, let's put it this way: It was the coldest Jan. 10 in Cincinnati history and probably the coldest game played in the NFL since the discovery of the wind-chill factor. It was nine below zero at the start of Sunday's American Football Conference championship game in Riverfront Stadium, with northwest winds gusting up to 35 mph, and by the third quarter the old w-c factor had dipped to an estimated 59� below zero. Now that's cold. "I can't ever remember a colder day than this one," said Cincinnati Coach Forrest Gregg after his team had iced the AFC title with a 27-7 win over San Diego. Gregg is an expert on the subject because he played for the Packers in the fabled 1967 Ice Bowl in Green Bay against the Cowboys. On Sunday in Cincinnati the Amundsen polar expedition wouldn't have made it to the 50-yard line.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
January 18, 1982

Winning With Cold Efficiency

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue
1 2

The bitter weather scarcely cooled the ardor of Cincy fans, who had waited 14 years for a championship. They stomped their cold feet thunderously in the game's dying seconds and showered the frozen field with debris. An even wilder scene took place in San Francisco, where 49er fans had waited 36 years for their championship. So now the former have-nots, both of them 6-10 teams last year, are in the Super Bowl. It must have been a cold day in hell, too.

1 2