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The Deals Of A Lifetime
Frank Deford
February 15, 1982
Here, in order, are Auerbach's top personnel maneuvers ranked according to the quality of the players involved and the degree of cleverness of the deal. For example, picking John Havlicek as the last man in the first round of the 1962 draft is always rated as a top Auerbachian decision, but given the choices available to him, that wasn't nearly as cagey as many of his other moves.
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February 15, 1982

The Deals Of A Lifetime

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10) While every other team was searching desperately for an exciting white star, selected Danny Ainge as 31st pick in the draft and then took him away from Toronto Blue Jays (1981). The More Things Change Dept.: In 1952, took Gene Conley in the 10th round because he was supposedly committed to baseball. Though Ainge, who joined Boston after the season began, has been used sparingly, the Celtics and a lot of other teams still regard him as a hot prospect.

11) While every team in the league was convinced Jo Jo White would have to serve a couple of years in the Army, Auerbach drafted him in the first round and got him into the Marine Reserves. In the lineup by December. Semper Addis (1969).

12) As a future draft choice, picked, in the third round, a 6'1" guard who couldn't shoot a lick—K.C. Jones (1956). This was the prototype for the 1968 first-round choice of a 6'5" guard who couldn't shoot—Chaney.

13) Took unknown Sam Jones as last selection of first round (1957).

14) Picked up Arnie Risen for nothing when he was about to retire from Rochester (1955). Risen would back up and school Russell and set the pattern of getting veteran fill-ins at virtually no cost: Clyde Lovellette, Andy Phillip, Carl Braun, Woody Sauldsberry, Willie Naulls, Wayne Embry, Emmette Bryant.

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