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They Showed The Way In Norway
Craig Neff
July 05, 1982
Or, ah, they didn't go slow in Oslo, Steve Scott, Mary Decker Tabb and Alberto Salazar establishing American records
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July 05, 1982

They Showed The Way In Norway

Or, ah, they didn't go slow in Oslo, Steve Scott, Mary Decker Tabb and Alberto Salazar establishing American records

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Scott had three yards on Maree at the finish. As Decker Tabb had done earlier, Scott watched the digital timer during his final sprint. "When I saw it hit 3:47, I knew I'd done it," he said. What he'd done was hit the tape in 3:48.53 and improved his American record. Only Sebastian Coe (3:47.33) and Steve Ovett (3:48.40), both of Great Britain, have ever run faster. And the runners behind Scott also had sensational times: Maree, 3:48.85; David Moorcroft of Great Britain, 3:49.34; New Zealand's John Walker, 3:49.50; Flynn, 3:50.54. Boit? No time, no place. In all, four of history's 13 fastest miles had been run.

The Oslo mile—in fact, the whole meet—had also cast a different light on the upcoming three-race series (3,000 meters, 800 meters and mile) between Coe and Ovett scheduled to begin with a 3,000 in London on July 17. Coe, the world-record holder at 800 and 1,000 meters as well as the mile, withdrew from Bislett because of sore shins, while Ovett, in finishing second to Suleiman Nyambui in the 3,000, showed the effects of the torn thigh muscle he suffered in a training-run fall last December. With Scott, Maree and others entered in the so-called Covett races, the two Britons may soon encounter further pain, that of losing.

"You always hear how Coe-Ovett is something to talk about," said Scott after his victory. "Pretty soon I think Scott-Maree is going to be something to talk about, too." In fact, like much of the Bislett meet, it already is.

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