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Call It The Moorcroft Massacre
Jerry Kirshenbaum
July 19, 1982
In a week of stunning races, the real eye-opener was David Moorcroft's world record romp in Oslo's 5,000
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July 19, 1982

Call It The Moorcroft Massacre

In a week of stunning races, the real eye-opener was David Moorcroft's world record romp in Oslo's 5,000

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He narrowly missed his goal in Oslo with a 3:47.69, the second-fastest mile in history and, of course, another American mark. "The world record is going to go this year," said Scott. "I hope I'll be the one to get it." Likely he will be. He's won 17 of 21 races this year—the most unusual being a downhill mile road race in Auckland, New Zealand, which he won in a perfectly astonishing 3:31.25.

The star of the Paris meet two nights later, however, was that other U.S. miler, Decker Tabb. Deciding at the last minute to run on a freshly resurfaced track in Jean Bouin Stadium, Decker Tabb—who had taken 9.02 off her own American 3,000 record in Oslo with an 8:29.71—ran the mile in 4:18.08 to reduce by 2.81 the world mark held by Lyudmila Veselkova of the Soviet Union.

To put Decker Tabb's mile time in perspective, however, consider that it converts to a 1,500 of only 3:58.98; the women's world record for the 1,500, a more commonly run distance, is 3:52.47. The mile equivalent of that clocking would be 4:11.07.

To put Moorcroft's record in proper perspective, however, one only has to listen to him: "I'm completely stunned. I must get down to earth as quickly as possible."

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