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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
Edited by Gay Flood
August 23, 1982
USF AND QUINTIN DAILEY Sir:What a banner year for SI! Your coverage of the seasonal sports has been fantastic, most notably this baseball season, and then there have been your blockbuster special reports—on Don Reese and cocaine in the NFL ("I'm Not Worth a Damn," June 14) and on the University of San Francisco and Quintin Dailey (Bringing Down the Curtain, Aug. 9)—your two best sports journalism pieces in recent memory. Please continue the high quality and fine writing you have brought us this year. It's nice to read the inside story, even if it hurts a little.MATTHEW FASANGTroy, Mich.
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August 23, 1982

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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USF AND QUINTIN DAILEY
Sir:
What a banner year for SI! Your coverage of the seasonal sports has been fantastic, most notably this baseball season, and then there have been your blockbuster special reports—on Don Reese and cocaine in the NFL ("I'm Not Worth a Damn," June 14) and on the University of San Francisco and Quintin Dailey (Bringing Down the Curtain, Aug. 9)—your two best sports journalism pieces in recent memory. Please continue the high quality and fine writing you have brought us this year. It's nice to read the inside story, even if it hurts a little.
MATTHEW FASANG
Troy, Mich.

Sir:
Applause! Applause! You've done a great job the past few months. First the cocaine article by Don Reese with John Underwood and now the probing story on the University of San Francisco and Quintin Dailey by Robert H. Boyle and Roger Jackson. You have proved to be the magazine that finds the major problems in athletics today and gives a true picture of the situation and of what needs to be done.
KRIS WALTERS
Boonville, Mo.

Sir:
After reading the article about Quintin Dailey and the death of USF basketball, I'm convinced that the Rev. John Lo Schiavo, S.J., president of the university, was correct in "bringing down the curtain" on the program there. Sure, Dailey is responsible for his embarrassing behavior on Dec. 21. He alone knows the disgrace resulting from the events of that night. But it seems to me Dailey is merely the symbol of a diseased system. He is nothing but the scapegoat for those USF officials, past and present, who, in trying to guarantee the success of the basketball program at USF, instead created or perpetuated a rotten system that now lies dead.
JEFFERSON CRISWELL
Springfield, Va.

Sir:
Congratulations to Father Lo Schiavo for having the courage to make such a tough decision. He put his foot down and set an example all schools should follow, namely, that education is more important than athletics. Athletes of all ages will benefit from this example.
BILL GANLEY
Salem, N.H.

Sir:
While the facts of the early morning hours of Dec. 21 seem shadowed in doubt, the assault on the integrity of the University of San Francisco by arrogant alumni is clear. I hope Father Lo Schiavo's decision will stand as a precedent for other university presidents and as a warning to overenthusiastic, underhanded boosters.
BRUCE THOMAS
Berkeley, Calif.

Sir:
How a man with All-America status and popularity and with the world at his feet could stoop so low is beyond me. Quintin Dailey seems to destroy his claim to innocence in the article by contradicting himself. Just to cite one instance, Dailey says, on page 74, that he fell asleep at 2:30 a.m., while on the following page he says he fell asleep at 3:40. For someone who hadn't been drinking, that sure sounds like bad timing to me.
KENNETH W. LOWE
Salisbury, Md.

Sir:
There is no charge easier to make, and none more difficult to disprove, than that of sexual assault. In the absence of any physical evidence, and based on the facts as stated in your story, I have a reasonable doubt as to Quintin Dailey's guilt, notwithstanding his pleading guilty to a reduced charge. The plea was plainly a tactical decision to put the matter behind him and assure his entry into the professional ranks. For the final verdict on Dailey, we must wait to see what kind of life he chooses to lead as a professional.
MARK T. DYKSTRA
Attorney-at-Law
Auburn, Ind.

Sir:
With all the questions and issues raised in your account of the USF scandal, there are two subsidiary matters that I find very disconcerting: attorney Bob Woolf's cavalier, sexist statement, "Even if he was guilty of everything the lady said, it wasn't that bad"; and the ungrammatical, almost illiterate utterances of Quintin Dailey, who was reportedly a "good student" in high school and who has completed three years at a supposedly decent university.
VIRGINIA WOLFE MANUEL
Hinckley, N.Y.

Sir:
I disapprove of the contents of your article covering the demise of the USF basketball program. To publish testimony of a sexual assault "in considerable detail" in such a popular sports magazine as yours is simply wrong. According to Robert H. Boyle and Roger Jackson, these alleged events were recorded to "delineate the terrible nature of [Quintin] Dailey's assault, a crime for which he might not have been punished." The quality and purpose of the story would have been upheld without these details. You have a moral responsibility to your readers, especially the young ones who do not yet have the maturity to properly deal with such things.
BOB CORD
Anderson, S.C.

Sir:
Isn't All-America Quintin Dailey giving John Q. Public the "finger" in the opening picture? I, for one, don't hold magazines or books with my middle finger protruding in that direction.
BOB KUFFEL
Park Ridge, Ill.

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