SI Vault
 
SCORECARD
Edited by Jerry Kirshenbaum
September 27, 1982
JUDGE BURCIAGA GETS DOWN TO BUSINESS WITH COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
September 27, 1982

Scorecard

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue
1 2 3

But there remained a chance that Oklahoma, Georgia and other like-minded institutions might one day have the tables turned on them. It's possible that athletes, asserting their property rights, might clamor for a bigger piece of the TV pie, too. A court in Indianapolis recently awarded an injured Indiana State football player workmen's compensation on the theory that, for purposes of football, he was an employee. As for the possibility that college athletes, who now receive relatively little compensation—often not even an education—for their efforts, might one day sue to win the right to draw salaries, Dave Cawood, the NCAA's public relations director, says, "In the present judicial climate, you can't tell what might happen." But Cawood shouldn't blame the judicial climate. However unwelcome Burciaga's decision may have been to many in college football, it should be emphasized that he isn't responsible for the fact that big-time, big-bucks college football has become more of a commercial than an educational enterprise. His ruling merely reflected that this was already the case.

1 2 3