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SCORECARD
Edited by Robert Sullivan
March 16, 1987
PONYGATE (CONT.)
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March 16, 1987

Scorecard

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USHL—FINAL STANDINGS

 

W

L

T

GF

GA

B

Pts

Rochester

37

11

0

340

200

2

76

Thunder Bay

35

12

1

312

180

2

73

Madison

33

15

0

282

205

1

67

Waterloo

23

25

0

259

266

6

52

Dubuque

25

22

1

263

236

1

52

Des Moines

23

23

2

277

241

3

51

Sioux City

23

24

1

256

236

1

48

St. Paul

21

23

4

236

228

1

47

North Iowa

15

32

1

226

311

3

34

Omaha

0

48

0

105

453

2

2

PONYGATE (CONT.)

"This is quite incredible," said NCAA enforcement director David Berst last week. He was referring to a new bomb-shell in the SMU scandal, which had already led the NCAA to shut down the Mustang football program for the 1987 season (SI, March 9). The latest development: Texas Governor Bill Clements's admission that, as head of SMU's board of governors in 1985, he approved ongoing payments to players from a secret slush fund. Elaborating upon revelations in the Dallas Times Herald, Clements said that after the NCAA placed SMU on probation in 1985, several of the board's 19 members met and decided to "honor agreements made to the athletes" by phasing out, rather than terminating, the payments. Clements also said that the NCAA had been notified about the continued payments. Berst called this assertion "ridiculous ... absurd."

The latest news caused great indignation in Dallas. Board members rushed to deny knowledge of the continued payments. The SMU faculty senate called on Clements "to make full disclosure of the board members he said joined him in authorizing payments." The senate and The United Methodist Church demanded the resignations of all SMU officials with prior knowledge of the scheme. "Mr. Clements is an intellectual embarrassment to this university," said biology professor Raj Sohal, a faculty senate member. "A small subgroup has been running this university for some time. Let's get rid of the whole lot."

The student body found ways to express its displeasure also. At last Wednesday's faculty senate meeting, a group chanted "No more lying or cheating." Student body president Trevor Pearlman said the student senate might sue yet unnamed university officials and boosters for harm brought to the university. "Our name has been tarnished," he said. "The value of the degree has diminished."

The United Methodist Church's accreditation board will meet in emergency session this week to consider severing the church's 76-year affiliation with SMU and halting its $1 million annual donation to the school. Meanwhile, several administrative and faculty committees are quietly studying a reorganization of the athletic department, and all participants seem to agree that SMU should consider a de-emphasis of big-time sport. Also, Berst said last week that he may reopen the NCAA's investigation and that even more penalties may be forthcoming.

SAME OLD OLLIE
Lieut. Col. Oliver North, who was castigated by the Tower Commission for his zealous conduct in the Iran-Contra affair, was quite a boxer during his days at the Naval Academy. In fact, he won the brigade 147-pound title in 1967. His former coach at Annapolis, Emerson P. Smith, recalls North's style as "very aggressive, without a lot of finesse."

IT'S ALIVE!
An employee at the Captain Video store in West Newton, Mass., was in a quandary. Should he file the 1986 Red Sox highlights video under Sports? Drama? Comedy? He finally settled on Science Fiction/Horror.

DOGGED PURSUIT

At 9 a.m. on Saturday, the first of 63 dogsled drivers mushed out of Anchorage and began racing on the Iditarod Trail, a snow-covered dogsled path that meanders 1,138 miles across southwestern Alaska. Some 11, 12, 13 or 14 days hence, the finishers of the 14th annual Iditarod, one of sport's most daunting marathons, will chug into Nome.

This year's Iditarod should be fiercely competitive. Libby Riddles, who in 1985 became the first woman to win the Iditarod, is back. So is Susan Butcher, who last year became the second woman to win the race, setting the course record of 11 days, 15 hours and 6 minutes. Four-time Iditarod champion Rick Swenson is also entered.

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