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Letters
Edited by Gay Flood
February 22, 1988
DEFORD ON BOWLING Frank Deford Goes Bowling (Jan. 25) was a long-overdue examination of a sport—yes, sport—that many people equate only with recreational activities like miniature golf and going to movies. The problems Deford addresses are real to those of us who receive quizzical looks when we reveal ourselves as serious bowlers.
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February 22, 1988

Letters

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DEFORD ON BOWLING
Frank Deford Goes Bowling (Jan. 25) was a long-overdue examination of a sport—yes, sport—that many people equate only with recreational activities like miniature golf and going to movies. The problems Deford addresses are real to those of us who receive quizzical looks when we reveal ourselves as serious bowlers.

However, I was disturbed by Dr. George Allen's statement that bowling centers don't attract college-educated crowds. Allen must not know about the Young American Bowling Alliance, Collegiate Division, which has more than 8,000 members nationwide. Approximately 400 teams compete in regional and national tournaments that culminate each year at the National Collegiate Bowling Championships.
BRIAN FEDROW
Evanston, Ill.

The Bronx Bombers—we are four ex-New Yorkers living in California—take exception to the article. Among us are a dentist, a psychologist, a stockbroker and a business executive. Our annual incomes average more than $100,000, we are all in our mid-30's, we are all married with children, and none of us is from the Midwest. If we are yuppies, so be it. We are not ashamed. Yuppies are good people, too. The bottom line is that bowling is fun and everyone can do it, young and old, rich and poor, well-educated and not. As for being well-dressed, we designed our own T-shirts, complete with New York Yankee pinstripes, and we own our own bowling shoes.
PHILIP KEMPLER, D.M.D.
Laguna Hills, Calif.

I'm a bank marketing director and an avid bowler, and I'll pummel the first person who calls me a yuppie. I understand why the bowling industry is desperately trying to take the game out of the gutter (so to speak): so it can attract yuppies and their limitless money. But bowling is biting the hand that feeds it. Do us all a favor—let the yups, DINKS, whatever they want to be called, embrace their next big trend. Leave bowling to those of us who enjoy it.
GREG HATALA
Randolph, N.J.

After reading Frank Deford's portrayal of Bob (Bull) (Cyclone) Sullivan (The Toughest Coach There Ever Was, April 30, 1984)—the best piece of sports journalism there ever was—I promised myself I would read anything and everything Deford wrote. This resolution was put to the test when I saw his article on bowling. Well, I enjoyed it so much "I didn't know whether to spit or go blind."
JAMES DEACH
Monterey, Calif.

Frank Deford is an artist. Then again, what do I know? I'm a bowler.
STEVE SOLSTAD
Wayzata, Minn.

WRESTLING PADRE (CONT.)
I was delighted to see your article A Ring and a Prayer in the Dec. 21 issue about Fray Tormenta, the wrestling priest of Xometla, Mexico. I am one of the sponsors of the Honor Society of the American High School Foundation in Mexico City, and my students have been working very hard to help the orphans under his care. Your readers will be happy to know that thanks to the efforts of these students, the orphans were able to have a very happy Christmas. On Dec. 19 we brought them pi�atas (left). Santa Claus presented a new pair of shoes to every child. In addition, there were toys, school supplies—Father Gutierrez requires every child in his care to attend classes—and a mountain of food provided by the high school student council. Now I'm working on arranging the chicken dinners they asked for.
ALLAN GOUD
Mathematics Teacher
American High School
Mexico City

VITALE SIGNS
Thanks for the comments on Dick Vitale (TELEVISION, Feb. 1). Someone has to put a muzzle on that guy. It's difficult enough to get my wife to watch college hoops with me, but when Vitale is the commentator, she's out of there.

I cannot fault Vitale's knowledge of the game. I cannot fault his enthusiasm, either. But as Jack McCallum says, most of us are not interested in what a great guy he is. We tune in to watch the game. He should move to the background, where he, and all commentators, should remain.
DREW B. GUFFEY
Bartow, Fla.

Jack McCallum's review is way off base. Dick Vitale's personal stories make his color commentary much more exciting. The only regret I have is that I don't know if Vitale hit the three-pointer when he shot around with the Ohio State team. Keep up the great work, Dick! We love you.
IRA D. PERLMAN
Woodmere, N. Y.

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