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FAREWELL TO A SPORTSMAN
Ernest Havemann
December 27, 1954
Death ends the career of Fred Miller, a most loyal son of Notre Dame
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December 27, 1954

Farewell To A Sportsman

Death ends the career of Fred Miller, a most loyal son of Notre Dame

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Miller was a good friend of Notre Dame's new coach, Terry Brennan. One of the classic Miller stories concerns the time he flew home to Milwaukee after a preseason practice game at South Bend in 1946. He took Brennan and Fred Kosikowski, who were varsity players then, with him. They flew into bad weather near Milwaukee, turned back towards South Bend, ran into a terrific thunderstorm and finally landed, gasoline almost gone, in a tree-studded field. Miller was the father of eight children and a devoted family man, but when he was asked later how he had felt during his ordeal, he said, "I kept thinking, Coach Leahy will kill me if I get these two stars of his injured. It'll ruin the season."

But though he was a friend of Brennan's, when Leahy retired, Miller in a sense retired too. He still saw all the games, occasionally worked out with the team and retained his place as Notre Dame's most avid fan, but his days as a volunteer coach were over. His thoughts turned more and more to baseball. It was rumored that he might buy the Milwaukee Braves, and he voiced very definite and very optimistic ideas on the future of baseball.

An earnest, devout man, Miller was deeply concerned with the welfare of the player. He hired professional baseball and football players for public relations work for the Miller company and talked enthusiastically about the advantages the program had for the players as well as for the company.

Miller made a habit of looking out for the welfare of other people. When his plane crashed last week he was thrown clear, though his leg was broken and he was burned over much of his body. A man who saw the crash rushed to the wreck and moved to help Miller.

"My God, don't bother about me," Miller shouted. "There are three others in the plane."

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