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SOUNDTRACK
December 20, 1954
THE EDITORS TAKE NOTE OF A WEEK IN WHICH JAMES D. NORRIS SAID "ABSURD," MAX SCHMELING REMEMBERED AN UNEXPECTEDLY HARD FIGHT AND A VETERAN SPORTSWRITER REMEMBERED THE NAME NORRIS
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December 20, 1954

Soundtrack

THE EDITORS TAKE NOTE OF A WEEK IN WHICH JAMES D. NORRIS SAID "ABSURD," MAX SCHMELING REMEMBERED AN UNEXPECTEDLY HARD FIGHT AND A VETERAN SPORTSWRITER REMEMBERED THE NAME NORRIS

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There's a catch, though. In their championship 1948 season the Cards netted only $7,500. Thereafter the team has lost money every year until 1954, when poor regular season gate receipts were offset somewhat by increased radio, TV and exhibition money. This year's profit is conceded to be tiny.

While Cardinal players and coaches expressed pleasure over the new dispensation, there were intimations that other, more prosperous owners in the National Football League were having nightmares that their players soon might be demanding a share in real, true profits. Thus spake George Halas, owner-coach of the Chicago Bears: "If [Wolfner's] looking for incentive, I suggest he double each player's salary immediately."

A NEWSPAPERMAN REMEMBERS

Jim Crusinberry today is semiretired, wintering in Arizona. At 75, he can look back on a long, eventful career as a newspaperman in Chicago, St. Louis and New York. His stories on the Black Sox scandal, along with others on horse racing and boxing, are included in the book, The Greatest Sport Stories from the Chicago Tribune .

Crusinberry has full confidence in Harry Thomas and declares that the first time the heavyweight boxer told his story of the fixed fights he implicated Jim Norris. Here is what Crusinberry told SI this week:

"I was the party who arranged for Harry Thomas to tell his story of how his bouts with Max Schmeling and Tony Galen to were fixed to the Chicago Tribune , and I have never doubted that he was telling the truth.

"I was living in Chicago at that time and was well acquainted with Lee Carroll, the man to whom Thomas wrote that the fight with Schmeling Dec. 13, 1937 was fixed for him to lose.

"A few days before that fight Carroll came to me and showed me the letter. I told him that he should be sure and keep it in his possession.

"After the Galento fight, Thomas, whom I'd met through Carroll, told me the whole story. He implicated Jim Norris then as he did in the SI story, along with Joe Jacobs and Nate Lewis. He said then that Norris was his real manager, not Lewis, and as I remember it his story was substantially the same as he told it to SI.

"After I'd heard the story I said to him, 'Harry, now that you're through fighting, wouldn't you like to get this thing out into the open and off your mind?' and he said, 'Yes, I think I would.'

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