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THINK AND LIFT
Ezra Bowen
December 20, 1954
The art of weight lifting, according to champions, requires powerful thought. without it, the lifter's power is directionless; but if his thinking is right, he'll feel as though he were alone in a void, and he may never notice the weight as he lifts
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December 20, 1954

Think And Lift

The art of weight lifting, according to champions, requires powerful thought. without it, the lifter's power is directionless; but if his thinking is right, he'll feel as though he were alone in a void, and he may never notice the weight as he lifts

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"If I concentrate hard enough, it's actually like being in a room all by myself. There's darkness all around, and all I have is the weight before me. If I'm nerved up for the effort, I feel the weight for the first three or four inches. After that, I don't feel the weight at all."

That, apparently, is all there is to it. Concentration, darkness; then think—and lift, just a little.

THE SNATCH
Starting snatch, Schemansky spreads hands wide. This costs him leverage but decreases distance bar must be hefted overhead. He flips 275-pound weight off floor, using back and shoulder muscles to give weight initial momentum which will help carry it all the way up in one unbroken movement. As barbell passes shoulders, 225-pound Schemansky does lightning split to get underneath the weight, then uses his tremendous leg power to reach standing finish.

CLEAN AND JERK
Kono uses closer grip for two-stage clean and jerk. First stage brings 325-pound weight to waist level, where short-legged Kono quickly squats to get under bar, then pushes with legs to reach standing position. Lifter may now rest until he is ready to jerk the weight overhead. When he is all set, Kono does half-split to get arms locked, then straightens up. Long pause and subsequent split allow for greater lifts than snatch or press.

CLEAN AND PRESS
In press, lifter depends less on speed, more on beef. Lift starts as Schemansky cleans weight to shoulder height. He pauses two seconds, then presses 275-pound barbell overhead with smooth push of arms, back and shoulders. In latter stage of lift, he may not move feet, double torso, or bend knees. Final push from dead stop is toughest maneuver for heavyweight Schemansky who feels his build is a little too light for this lift.

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