SI Vault
 
HELP WANTED MALE
William F. Talbert
December 06, 1954
Departing for Australia, the U.S. Davis Cup team captain leaves an ad with SI which expresses some of his concern about the present tennis situation in America
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
December 06, 1954

Help Wanted Male

Departing for Australia, the U.S. Davis Cup team captain leaves an ad with SI which expresses some of his concern about the present tennis situation in America

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue
1 2 3

"X" will be dealt with later, but for now let's examine the ad.

The ages of 18-20 were chosen because even then champions can be recognized. Perry T. Jones, President of the Southern California Tennis Association, whose fertile program more than any other has produced great U.S. champions, has often said he knew Vines, Kramer, Schroeder and Gonzales had what it takes at age 16. He has said to me: "It is obvious then whether or not they'll be champions."

An aptitude for sport is important. Good tennis players can usually throw and hit a baseball, catch and kick a football, handle a basketball, run and swim, all with ease.

In this sport, like others, many qualities are required to be really great—the speed of a Jesse Owens, the eye and timing of a Ted Williams, the heart and endurance of a Rocky Marciano, the imagination and brain of an Eddie Arcaro—and everything Roger Bannister had when he broke the four-minute mile.

To get to the top requires hard work, and tennis is no exception. Hours on the court ironing out weaknesses are essential. Even then you might fail, but whether your lot is success or failure, the old adage "practice makes perfect" is as true in this game as in any other.

One incentive for the hard work is the chance to see the world without joining the Navy. Tennis is played in almost every country in the world, including Russia. Trips to South America, South Africa, Europe, India, Japan and Australia are available to champions. These countries want to see you—at their expense.

HEALTHY FOR BANK ACCOUNTS

Vines, Tilden, Budge and Kramer reached the top with a healthy influence on their bank accounts. They established themselves as the leading amateurs in the world and happily succumbed to the pro lure. Some of their take-home pay checks reached $100,-000 for one year's work. Not bad!

Various others of the top ten "not interested in the pro game" used their contacts successfully in the business world. Frank Hunter heads "21" Brands, liquor dealers. Sidney Wood's laundry operation is a Manhattan standout. Frank Shields is a successful insurance broker. Ted Schroeder, in the refrigerator business, has pulled out as many deals as he used to pull out five-set matches.

If you've been wondering about "X," here's the explanation.

Continue Story
1 2 3