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GLORY DAY IN COLUMBUS
Roger Kahn
November 29, 1954
Ohio State turned on its historic tormentor, Michigan, Saturday and trounced the Wolverines 21-7. The victory gave the Buckeyes a Rose Bowl bid and gave the city of Columbus a night of wild singing, cheering and celebrating
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November 29, 1954

Glory Day In Columbus

Ohio State turned on its historic tormentor, Michigan, Saturday and trounced the Wolverines 21-7. The victory gave the Buckeyes a Rose Bowl bid and gave the city of Columbus a night of wild singing, cheering and celebrating

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When the game resumed Michigan pushed, Ohio held, Ohio pushed, Michigan held and the third quarter waned. Then Michigan pushed and fumbled. Ohio State took over on its own 21, failed to gain and Fullback Hubert Bobo delivered a classic 80-yard punt: 40 yards straight up, 40 yards straight down. Michigan recovered the ball on the Buckeyes' 14-yard line.

Quickly the Wolverines moved to the 4. With three more carries, Cline and Fullback Dave Hill rammed the ball to within a foot of the goal line. On fourth down Hill flung himself into the center of the line. The Ohio State line held fast.

That was the hinge about which the football game and the autumn season in Columbus revolved. Michigan was beatable. It took the Buckeyes just the next 12 plays to march almost 100 yards to a touchdown. They got it when Leggett threw nine yards to End Dave Brubaker. Hopalong Cassady had set it up with a 52-yard run. Again Weed converted and this time the crowd's roar carried with it the lust and assurance of a cheer sent up by the Praetorian Guard.

Michigan could push no more. Ohio State scored again with 44 seconds remaining, but this final touchdown was not needed. Before the Buckeyes' final drive ended, the fans were chanting their song. Before the drive ended, programs and newspapers were torn and thrown, filling the air with king-sized ticker tape. Before the drive was over Ohio State students lofted a banner. It read: "BEAT U.S.C. JAN. 1."

At the final whistle, Ohio State's heroes stopped playing football and began to jump up and down. Then they hoisted Woody Hayes to their shoulders and carried him into the clubhouse. They dunked him in a shower and they cheered him. Finally they let him meet the press.

For Hayes the dunking was a pleasure. He told the press that. He told them more, delivering short speeches like a man accustomed to making the dais of both a Rotary luncheon and a Kiwanis luncheon on the same day. Once a question interrupted: "What happened to change the game around from the first half to the second?"

"You can't run over a team like mine for a full 60 minutes," Hayes said.

He made more short speeches until a minor Ohio State official appeared with an insect gun full of sweet-smelling liquid. He sprayed Hayes. "It's scent of roses, Woody," cried the official. "Scent of roses for yuh, Woody boy."

"I'll say this," Hayes announced. "We plan to spend the holidays on the coast."

Back in Columbus the evening began slowly. "It's taking a while," explained the city editor of a local newspaper, "because the folks are spent."

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