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November 29, 1954
THE EDITORS POINT TO ONE EFFECT OF POLITE CARTELS IN THE BOWL BUSINESS AND REGISTER DISSENT ON A BOXING-REFORM ALTERNATIVE, BUT THEY ARE CHEERED BY A BAD FIGHT AND A BACK-TALKING COACH
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November 29, 1954

Soundtrack

THE EDITORS POINT TO ONE EFFECT OF POLITE CARTELS IN THE BOWL BUSINESS AND REGISTER DISSENT ON A BOXING-REFORM ALTERNATIVE, BUT THEY ARE CHEERED BY A BAD FIGHT AND A BACK-TALKING COACH

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Happy New Year

Bowl-game proprietors used to compete for New Year's Day teams in an old-fashioned open market. About this time every year they would be whipping telegrams back and forth across the country, trying to line up the strongest college clubs for their respective Bowls. Not any more. Most of the Bowls have given up the rigors of free competition for polite cartel agreements?with selected football conferences sending their top teams (except some conferences won't let the same team go two years running).

Last week football consumers learned something of what this system will offer them on New Year's.

Southern California was whacked 34-0 by UCLA?and became the Pacific Coast Conference's representative in the Rose Bowl. (UCLA was in the Bowl last year.)

Arkansas lost its second straight game?this one 7-6 to Louisiana State?but, with the best record in the Southwest Conference, was picked to play in the Cotton Bowl.

Nebraska, walloped 55-7 by Oklahoma, picked itself up to find it had been named to represent the Big Seven Conference in the Orange Bowl.

Happy New Year, everyone.

Progress report

SI notes with satisfaction that the New York State Athletic Commission swung some businesslike punches of its own last week.

After listening to testimony from fight managers who said they had to make $100 "donations" to the International Boxing Guild's New York chapter whenever their tigers got a TV fight (SI, Nov. 22), Bob Christenberry's commission suspended two IBG managers and two matchmakers who seemed, on the testimony, most involved. It suspended two other managers for other rule infractions. And it promised to turn its preliminary inquiry on these matters into a hearing. Said Christenberry: "If the charges are sustained, additional discipline will be meted out."

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