SI Vault
 
19th HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
November 22, 1954
RETIRED TO CROSLEY FIELD Sirs:Note:?publication (SI, Nov. 1) of F.P.A.'s lines on Tinker to Evers to Chance prompted the following versified rejoinder from a retired English professor who is an ardent supporter of the Cincinnati Redlegs:
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
November 22, 1954

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

I just had to finish that 1934 B.A.A. Marathon. It was getting late, and there wasn't anyone around who gave a hoot about giving me any assistance! It is indeed a very weird feeling when you know that you should keep moving but are completely unable to control those legs of spaghetti!
JOHN C. RICE, JR.
Boston

THE MAPLE LEAF ON HIS JERSEY
Sirs:
I have been an enthusiastic reader of SI since its inception and in order to keep the record for good reporting clear, would like to point out an error in your last issue.

The article Marathon Craze has a picture of a group of contestants at Madison Square Garden, showing Shrubb of England, Dorando of Italy, Ives of France and Longboat, Hayes and Maloney as Americans. While this may be theoretically correct, insofar as continental location is concerned, it should be pointed out that Tom Longboat was a Canadian and can be seen wearing the Maple Leaf emblem on his jersey. As a former Canadian who watched him run many times, and saw him beat Shrubb in the same Madison Square Garden, I think you should retract this false classification.
ROY B. NORDHEIMER
Chicago

?Cug-wa-gee, called Tom Longboat, was a Canadian Iroquois Indian who became one of the greatest distance runners of all time without ever taking his training too seriously. At one time he set a Boston Marathon record, defeated both Shrubb and Dorando, and out-raced a horse and buggy over a 12-mile course. Unlike Jim Thorpe, Tom never dropped into obscurity, died a well-remembered hero in 1949 on Ottawa's Onondaga Reservation.?ED.

TOO GREEN FOR CRIMSON
Sirs:
That very good shot of Bo McMillin eluding the two Harvard players for the t.d. which gave little Centre College the 6-0 victory over the Crimson calls to mind the subsequent dramatic football finale of Erwin Gehrke of Harvard, one of the players depicted in this photo as missing his man!

Gehrke returned to Harvard, after having stayed out of college for a year, in the fall of 1924. In the Harvard-Yale game, which was played at New Haven that year, Gehrke appeared on the scene on crutches. Despite a badly battered leg, he shed the crutches, started for Harvard at halfback, and carried the ball innumerable times for innumerable first downs. Before the half had ended, he had kicked two field goals with a water-soaked ball in the driving rain! To be sure, a highly efficient Yale team beat Harvard that year 19-6, but all the Eli scoring was made during the second half?after Gehrke had been removed from the game because of further injuries.

Crimson rooters, who remember this game, like to think of it in terms of Gehrke 6, Yale 0, for that is the way things really were when this fellow was forced to leave this contest. May I suggest that Gehrke was only a sophomore and very green when the 1921 Harvard-Centre picture was taken!
JOHN C. RICE, JR.
Boston

?Runner Rice had a busy week. See page 80.?ED.

RIVAL PIONEERS
Sirs:
Mr. J. Edgar Hoover's contribution to the HOTBOX (SI, Oct. 25) includes this statement: " Walter Camp selected his first mythical team in 1889..." referring to the first All-American football team. Mr. Hoover has apparently accepted what may be called the "Camp Legend" and is not aware of the following facts:

1) The selections for 1889 and 1890 were first published in Week's Sport, a periodical conducted by Caspar Whitney No credit line of authorship is given.

Continue Story
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11