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19th HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
November 22, 1954
RETIRED TO CROSLEY FIELD Sirs:Note:?publication (SI, Nov. 1) of F.P.A.'s lines on Tinker to Evers to Chance prompted the following versified rejoinder from a retired English professor who is an ardent supporter of the Cincinnati Redlegs:
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November 22, 1954

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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2) Under Caspar Whitney's credit line, teams for 1891-1896 first appeared in Harper's Weekly. In the issue of Dec. 12, 1891, the Week's Sport selections for 1889 and 1896 were repeated?with no mention of Camp as author or collaborator.

3) Beginning with the 1894 issue, the Official Football Guide, which was edited by Walter Camp, listed the 1889-1896 teams with authorship credit being specifically given to Caspar Whitney.

4) The first team known to have carried a Walter Camp credit line was a team (with second and third teams) for 1897 which appeared in Whitney's "Amateur Sport" department of Harper's while Whitney was on a world sports tour.

5) Whitney's last selection for Harper's were teams for 1898 and 1899.

6) Camp made selections for Collier's Weekly, beginning with teams (first, second and third) for 1898 and annually thereafter, including teams for 1924?except that he selected no teams of college players for 1917.

7) In the Collier's issue of Jan. 14, 1899 Camp listed the 1889-1896 teams. In the issue of Jan. 28, 1899 Camp said: "In giving the list of All-American teams for a number of years in a recent issue it was my intention to state that the selections were those of Mr. Caspar Whitney in Harper's Weekly."
CLARENCE G. McDAVITT
Newtonville, Mass.

?Both Walter Camp and Editor Whitney pioneered in the selection of annual All-America teams, but generally avoided crediting the other for his share in the work. Reader McDavitt, himself an authority on early All-America teams, is correct in stating that Camp gave Whitney (whom he succeeded as editor of the Official Football Guide) credit for the '89-96 selections. But Camp also claimed in the 1899 Guide that the idea of annual All-America selections was his own.?ED.

WHAT TRADITIONS?
Sirs:
"WHEN THE PROS COME MARCHING IN" PROVIDES ANOTHER LINK IN OUR TIME-HONORED CONTENTION THAT "THE PEOPLE WILL DETERMINE WHAT THEY WANT TO SEE" REGARDLESS OF DICTATES HANDED DOWN BY UNIVERSITY MEN IMBUED WITH ACADEMIC TRADITIONS.
NICK KERBAWY
General Manager, Detroit Lions
Detroit, Mich

I HAVE PLAYED THE GAME
Sirs:
I was impressed with the article on the U.S.S.R.'s plan to win the 1956 Olympic Games at Melbourne. As I read through the article I could not help recalling a lesser Olympics?the Second Asian Games held in Manila, Philippines. There a Japanese team came that was a replica of your Russian juggernaut. One line in the article is most apt, i.e., "Nothing is being left to chance."

Control of Japanese athletics is also cabinet status. They practiced, dead-set, with almost monotonous regularity. Their officials, including newspapermen, cameramen, radio announcers, almost outnumbered their athletic delegates. And as decidedly as the Russians did, they won. They have something over the Russians, though. When they lose, they weep, and openly.

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