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PHILADELPHIA HEIRLOOMS, FAME & FORTUNE ON HORSEBACK, ARE PEP-UP PILLS CRICKET?
November 15, 1954
Hmm!
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November 15, 1954

Philadelphia Heirlooms, Fame & Fortune On Horseback, Are Pep-up Pills Cricket?

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Hmm!

OCT. 20: Johnny Saxton takes the world welterweight championship from Kid Gavilan in an odoriferous waltz in Philadelphia, as the ringside press lets out headline screams and the screenside television audience holds its nose.

OCT. 28: SI demands Boxing's Dirty Business Must Be Cleaned Up Now.

OCT. 28: New York District Attorney Hogan subpoenas IBG records to start investigation into boxing's dirty business.

NOV. 4: SI announces it will print a "no-progress" report of New York Boxing Commissioner Christenberry's two years in office in its issue which will appear Nov. 11.

NOV. 5: Commissioner Christenberry orders an assortment of a dozen fight managers, promoters, matchmakers and others to explain their possible connection with boxing's dirty business. Sets the hearings for Nov. 12.

It wouldn't take the sharpest intellect ever honed to guess what the boxing world has been reading lately. But the principals involved in the mess would have to have been brewed yesterday to think that they can get by with a few late-round headline flurries.

Philadelphia album

The Philadelphia Athletics were sold again last week and it can only be hoped that the deed was marked "all sales final." Arnold Johnson, the Chicago nickel-in-the-slot tycoon, bought the team just as he had appeared to do a month ago and, of course, he plans to move it to Kansas City.

Although 91-year-old Connie Mack was quite ill, Johnson announced that Connie would be honorary president of the new club. There were, the announcement indicated, jobs available for the rest of the Mack family, too. They were good jobs. Roy Mack, one of Connie's sons, jumped at one. Earle, another son, did not.

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