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The Question: Would you want your son to be a big-time football player?
Jimmy Jemail
November 01, 1954
The Answers:
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November 01, 1954

The Question: Would You Want Your Son To Be A Big-time Football Player?

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The Answers:

CLIFF DREW
HARRISBURG, PA.
CHICKEN FARMER
"Heck, no! After all those cheers and all those girls, how could I ever get him back on my chicken farm? That would be easier if he were a scholar. He would be resigned and philosophical. But a football star would most likely be dreaming about the chickens back on the campus."

MARION E. JACKSON
SPORTS EDITOR
ATLANTA Daily World
"Yes. Football develops character, understanding and sportsmanship. I played the game. The coach is father, mother, teacher and minister to his squad. And look what football has done for so many colored players—Fritz Pollard of Brown, Duke Slater of Iowa, J. C. Caroline of Illinois."

JULIE ROMANO
PLATTEKILL, N.Y.
ENTERTAINER
"No. With that athletic ability I'd rather he be a Jack Dempsey, a Gene Tunney, a Rocky Marciano. The risk of permanent injury in the ring isn't as great. And he'd be fairly rewarded. A college football star draws thousands to a game. What does he get in return? A paltry scholarship, if that."

ROGER BLACK
BLOOMINGTON, IND.
LUMBER
"No, although I love the game. But being nuts about football doesn't make sense. It often gives boys the wrong sense of values if they get to be real big-time. They're idolized everywhere. There's too great a letdown after college days if the same adulation doesn't continue."

EMMETT O'DONNELL JR.
LT. GEN. USAF
WASHINGTON, D.C.
"Yes, if he could play good football. But I wouldn't want football to be the biggest thing in his life. The prospect of serious injuries wouldn't worry me. Players in good condition are seldom injured seriously. I know that from experience. I was an assistant coach at West Point for three years."

MARCELO SANCHEZ
HAVANA, CUBA
EXECUTIVE
"Yes. An All-America tag helps a man go far in life. Sure, he may break a leg or have his face twisted, but he takes that chance when he crosses the street. My nephew was an All-America end at U.C.L.A. Shortly after graduation he became a vice president of a large company. No drag, either."

JOHN P. CARMICHAEL
SPORTS EDITOR
CHICAGO Daily News
"Yes. Players enjoy the competition. They benefit from the association and prestige to a degree that far overshadows the possibility of injury or tendency to become athletic bums. There should be more full scholarships for boys who want to trade football ability for honest educations."

BENSON FORD
DETROIT
VICE PRESIDENT
FORD MOTOR CO.
"Yes, if his studies didn't suffer. What father wouldn't? Football grew out of American colleges. It's the greatest competitive game ever developed. A boy who can star on the football field while maintaining good scholastic grades is a potential leader in industry."

MRS. THEODORE INNES
RATON, N.M.
HOUSEWIFE
"No. He played in high school. I was so worried that I could never watch him play. He used to say: 'Mother, you never get hurt if you follow the rules.' When he did get hurt he said someone else didn't follow the rules. At college, I pleaded with him 'not to be beef for the varsity.' "

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