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FAIR HARVARD FELL
Tom Siler
November 08, 1954
Little Centre College upset the mighty Crimson and built the legend of the Prayin' Colonels, whose surprising success was no accident
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November 08, 1954

Fair Harvard Fell

Little Centre College upset the mighty Crimson and built the legend of the Prayin' Colonels, whose surprising success was no accident

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ROSCOE'S HAT AND COAT

M.I.T. students, whose coolness toward Harvard was well known, raced out of the stands, lugged McMillin around on their shoulders, leveled the goal posts and snake danced until exhausted. It was some time before all the Centre players escaped the ecstatic fans. Some were surprisingly nonchalant. A few sold their game jerseys at souvenir prices ranging from $10 to $50. Probably Roscoe had the best time of all. M.I.T. students shanghaied him and began a house-to-house visit along fraternity row, pausing frequently for refreshments. Well after midnight they sent Roscoe to the Lenox Hotel in a cab, but they kept his dearly prized hat and coat. For years these souvenirs hung in the Beta Theta Pi house under a sign which read, "Roscoe's hat and coat."

Down in Danville the carnival spirit held sway and business closed down for a week. Bonfires dotted alleys and streets. The legend "C 6, H 0" was smeared on sidewalks, fences, store windows, telephone poles, mailboxes, cars. One energetic youth climbed the water tower and painted the score there too. Not even cattle were safe. College boys rounded up 10 or 12 milk cows, painted the "C 6, H 0" on their hides and drove them, bewildered and bawling, down Danville's normally quiet main street.

Governor Morrow met the returning heroes at Lexington and escorted them the last 50 miles to Danville. Stores were closed, classes forgotten. The players, draped over the city's flashiest fire truck, were paraded up and down tree-lined streets. Finally, Bo was called upon for a speech. He delivered it with commendable brevity: "This is the happiest day of my life."

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