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AUTUMNAL FIRE
John O'Reilly
November 08, 1954
The chemistry of turning leaves produces their annual brilliance
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November 08, 1954

Autumnal Fire

The chemistry of turning leaves produces their annual brilliance

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PAINTED HILLS IN SUNSHINE

The panorama is made even brighter when the clear, crisp days of October and November come along. Frosty nights are succeeded by crisp, clear days with the painted hills standing out in strong sunshine. This is the time when the arguments start. It seems that every student of this phenomenon has his own opinion about when the color is at its height. There also is great difference of opinion as to whether the color is better this year or the year before. Individuals have their own favorite spots where they claim the color is better than anywhere else.

I'll go along with those who hold out for the highlands of the Hudson. The mountains through which the Hudson River flows are spectacular at any time of the year, but when the forests covering them take on their autumn brilliance there is no other region which can top it.

Each year there are hundreds of thousands of people who join in this opinion. Their cars jam the roads on either side of the river and they crowd the lookout points to soak in the view. One favorite cruising ground up the Hudson is the Palisades Interstate Park. Visitors from all over the country arrange their trips to pass through the park when the color is bright.

A. K. Morgan, general manager of the park and a deep student of autumn coloring, says that the display in the park this fall will be better than last year. He points out that the frequent rains during the summer caused a heavy growth of leaves which will provide the best ever. But Mr. Morgan is prejudiced. If you go up to New England the local experts on fall color will tell you the same thing.

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