SI Vault
 
ARCHIE CHALLENGERS IBC
Budd Schulberg
November 01, 1954
Light-Heavyweight champion Archie Moore, who campaigned for 18 years before the boxing monopoly permitted him to appear at Madison Square Garden, took his case to the public on ABC television last Saturday night. Said Moore: "It's just too tough for me to get a crack at the heavyweight title. I understand Rocky Marciano's manager, Al Weill, said, 'We'll fight Moore 10 years from now.' That's too long." Moore urged fans to write the TV sponsors, sportswriters and the New York State Athletic Commission, demanding the match. To prove his right to title shot, Moore told Sports-caster Guy LeBow he would undertake to knock out Cuban contender Nino Valdes and defeat British heavyweight Don Cockell within the space of two weeks. Promised Archie: "If I don't knock out Valdes, I'll give my purse to charity. And if I don't beat Cockell, I'll retire from campaigning in the heavyweight ranks—permanently."
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
November 01, 1954

Archie Challengers Ibc

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue

Light-Heavyweight champion Archie Moore, who campaigned for 18 years before the boxing monopoly permitted him to appear at Madison Square Garden, took his case to the public on ABC television last Saturday night. Said Moore: "It's just too tough for me to get a crack at the heavyweight title. I understand Rocky Marciano's manager, Al Weill, said, 'We'll fight Moore 10 years from now.' That's too long." Moore urged fans to write the TV sponsors, sportswriters and the New York State Athletic Commission, demanding the match. To prove his right to title shot, Moore told Sports-caster Guy LeBow he would undertake to knock out Cuban contender Nino Valdes and defeat British heavyweight Don Cockell within the space of two weeks. Promised Archie: "If I don't knock out Valdes, I'll give my purse to charity. And if I don't beat Cockell, I'll retire from campaigning in the heavyweight ranks—permanently."

1