SI Vault
 
VANCOUVER FUN & GAMES
September 27, 1954
Though the fact was almost lost in the glare of publicity surrounding the celebrated "mile of the century," this summer's British Empire & Commonwealth Games were much more than a big track meet. Hundreds of fencers, boxers, wrestlers, cyclists, swimmers, oarsmen and lawn bowlers came to mountain-bordered Vancouver from all over the world. They met in friendly combat before the camera's eye—in school and civic gymnasiums, at a new pool, a new velodrome, a countryside rowing course, and on lovely flower-bordered turf—in a true carnival of amateur sport.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
September 27, 1954

Vancouver Fun & Games

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue

Though the fact was almost lost in the glare of publicity surrounding the celebrated "mile of the century," this summer's British Empire & Commonwealth Games were much more than a big track meet. Hundreds of fencers, boxers, wrestlers, cyclists, swimmers, oarsmen and lawn bowlers came to mountain-bordered Vancouver from all over the world. They met in friendly combat before the camera's eye—in school and civic gymnasiums, at a new pool, a new velodrome, a countryside rowing course, and on lovely flower-bordered turf—in a true carnival of amateur sport.

Women Fencers from Australia, Canada, England, New Zealand, Wales performed before attentive men judges in Lord Byng High School gymnasium.

Bicycle Racers from all parts of the Empire showed their form on specially built track with straightaways paralleling the grandstand and severe, 45� turns, banked 32 feet high for safety, like the sides of a giant saucer.

Lawn Bowlers from as far away as South Africa and Hong Kong, many in their 60s and 70s, assembled on the rose-bordered lawns of Vancouver's new Westminster Bowling Club to go through the paces of their favorite sport, which include easygoing bowling, a little walking and amiable conversation among the bowlers.

1