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CURTAIN OF DEATH
Charles L. Cadieux
September 20, 1954
Modern fish poisoning helps sportsmen but doesn't foul the water
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September 20, 1954

Curtain Of Death

Modern fish poisoning helps sportsmen but doesn't foul the water

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SURGERY OF THE FISHERIES

The biggest problem with most eradication programs is that of disposing of the windrows of dead fish on shore. If the fish aren't picked up and used for food, their presence soon becomes common knowledge. Waters treated with Fish-Tox remain toxic to fish for periods varying from 10 to 80 days, depending upon the water temperature. Warm waters dissipate the poison much faster than chill waters.

This is the new surgery of the fisheries world and, like medicine's surgery, it is a drastic step to be used only when the situation has become desperate. Now fishery biologists are discovering new uses for the killer in limited forms of surgery. It is possible to cut down carp populations without harming game fishes by baiting the undesirable fish into shallow bays or inlets, sealing off the escape route with seines, and then applying Fish-Tox.

Overpopulations of desirable fish can also be thinned out. Two interconnected lakes swarming with rock bass yielded poor fishing because there just wasn't enough food. So one lake was dosed, and the population of the other spread to the now-fishless waters. The rock bass grew larger.

Fish-Tox has even turned out to be a boon to ducks. The Fish and Wildlife Service used it in the big Arrow-wood Refuge in North Dakota to kill the carp so that duck foods would prosper. In most cases, however, it is the angler who benefits from this modern refinement of one of the oldest poisons known to man.

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