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COLUMN OF THE WEEK
James Reston
September 20, 1954
New York Times Troubled by New York's seeming indifference to the world's serious state, James Reston, the distinguished Washington correspondent of the New York Times, last week sought an explanation. He found New Yorkers did care—and very much so
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September 20, 1954

Column Of The Week

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New York Times

Troubled by New York's seeming indifference to the world's serious state, James Reston, the distinguished Washington correspondent of the New York Times, last week sought an explanation. He found New Yorkers did care—and very much so

Q.—I've come to New York to see whether anybody's paying any attention to what's going on in Washington.

A.—We sure are. The Yankees have one more game there and if they don't win it, they're through.

Q.—Yes, but I mean—

A.—And they'd better win the last three with Washington at the Stadium too.

Q.—I mean Washington in general. The big things that have been happening down there recently. What do you really think of Washington?

A.—Strictly a second-division club. Nothing's happened down there since Walter Johnson. They can't hit and they're weak down the middle. If Stengel hadn't given them Porterfield, they'd be in the cellar.

YANKEE-INDIAN COEXISTENCE?

Q.—Let me be specific. I'd like to ask you about some of the things of world importance that are being widely discussed where I come from. For example, the policy of coexistence.

A.—It's for the birds. That's exactly what's wrong with Stengel. He's been coexisting with Cleveland too much. Nine times, in fact. He even coexists with Washington. Last year he beat 'em fourteen times and lost only six. This year he's beaten them only eleven times, less than he's beaten any other club in the league, while Cleveland's beaten them seventeen times. See what I mean? This "coexistence" is the bunk. Stengel should leave it to the Orioles.

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