SI Vault
 
19th HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
September 13, 1954
BANG! BANG!Sirs: California's deer season opened with the usual oddities. One hunter used a 30-30 rifle as a cane in jumping across a creek. He fell, the gun discharged and the bullet struck his pocket, splintering a pocketknife and other assorted articles. Bits of metal penetrated his skin.
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September 13, 1954

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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BOSCO
Sirs:
...under "Dogs generally considered good with children," I believe you inadvertently left out the Great Dane, or Messrs. J. J. Deutsch and J. J. McCoy have. We had a Great Dane (life span seven years) from the time my younger sister was two years old. He was wonderful with her. The first day we had him, she dragged his dinner away from him while he was eating. My father stood there poised to grab the dog if he should snap—the dog stood motionless and quiet until his pan was returned—then continued eating.

We used to confide in Bosco (that was his name) and he seemed to tell us with his eyes that he understood...
MARY L. PATTISON
Garland, Tex.

LOUISIANA TUG-OF-WAR
Sirs:
...May I comment on the article about fishing for the alligator gar...The method is this: Make a loop of baling wire or some similar flexible wire. Tie with a heavy cord, in the loop, a chunk of overripe meat or fish. Make a float out of a bottle, sealing the cork. Attach the loop and the bottle-float to a length of clothesline, allowing the loop to descend into the water about three or four feet. The gar then sticks his snout through the loop, the float bobs up and down or is pulled down. You yank on the clothesline and a spirited tug-of-war is on until the gar is subdued and brought to the deck or the shore. This technique is used quite extensively in the southeastern marsh country of Louisiana.
EDWARD J. KAMMER
Vice-President, Dean of Faculties
De Paul University
Chicago, Ill.

YANKEE DOODLE IKE
Sirs:
I thought your readers would be interested in this modern American primitive that is painted on the wall of a miniature golf concession at Coney Island.
CAROL L. MERCADO
New York

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