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January 10, 1955
THE EDITORS NOTE WITH ADMIRATION SAMMY LEE'S REBUTTAL TO AN ASIAN COMMUNIST, THE SECRETARY OF STATE'S DEMAND FOR TENNIS BRIEFING AND THE DESCENT OF 26 CALIFORNIA KELPS ON NEW YORK
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January 10, 1955

Soundtrack

THE EDITORS NOTE WITH ADMIRATION SAMMY LEE'S REBUTTAL TO AN ASIAN COMMUNIST, THE SECRETARY OF STATE'S DEMAND FOR TENNIS BRIEFING AND THE DESCENT OF 26 CALIFORNIA KELPS ON NEW YORK

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Joe was already training Gil Turner, the Philadelphia welterweight, when he took over Andrews' training last November. That was just after the elderly Joey Maxim had outpointed the youngster in spite of a right eye which had been closed in the first round. Since then Andrews had grudgingly endured the Spartan training grind that Joe himself went through in the days when he was preparing himself to win the heavyweight championship at the age of 23. Before the Smith fight, Andrews ran four to six miles every morning and boxed with live targets, in keeping with Joe's belief: "They've got to run and they've got to box. That makes fighters."

Panting through these rigors, Paul got so mad at Joe that Miles thought the boy would swing on the 235-pound ex-champion.

"He might have thought about it, yeh," Joe observed, "and I know I've gone back a long way, but I ain't went back that far."

This was said with a grin as quiet and self-assured as Joe's insistence that Andrews won't fight Moore until he has sanded the rough spots off what he firmly believes is a pretty fair piece of fighter. Or Joe won't play any more.

The soccer underground

While the attention of the country was focused on football bowl games, a hard core of sports subversives met in secret sessions (as far as national publicity was concerned) at St. Petersburg, Fla. for a full week and then, just before the New Year, scattered through the country again to continue their fanatical efforts in behalf of an ideology known as soccer.

The whole affair, attended by 117 soccer players from 26 schools and by 23 card-carrying members of the United States Soccer Coaches Association, might have gone unexposed—except for local publicity—had not an SI correspondent, masquerading as a soccer addict, gained entrance to the sessions. The SI man has turned in a report that names names and flatly charges that there exists in the U.S. a strong underground movement dedicated to spreading interest and participation in this game of soccer even if it means the overthrow of school and college football by force and violence.

The soccer boom (SI, Nov. 29) has now progressed to the point where its leaders seem to be actually brazen about their intentions. Carlton H. Reilly of Brooklyn College in New York did not even bother to lower his voice at St. Pete as he recalled that the game was played mainly between Fall River, Mass. and Baltimore up until a few years ago.

"Now," shouted Reilly, "the game is being taken up by more and more colleges in the South and the Middle West and Far West! In New York, the game is spreading like wildfire in the high schools! And many colleges are discovering that to be successful in football it's whole hog or nothing. I am glad to report that Georgetown, Fordham and Adelphi have dropped football entirely and are now playing soccer!"

When order had been restored, there was a more sobering report from another operative, John Eiler, soccer coach at Slippery Rock State Teachers College.

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