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January 10, 1955
THE EDITORS NOTE WITH ADMIRATION SAMMY LEE'S REBUTTAL TO AN ASIAN COMMUNIST, THE SECRETARY OF STATE'S DEMAND FOR TENNIS BRIEFING AND THE DESCENT OF 26 CALIFORNIA KELPS ON NEW YORK
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January 10, 1955

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THE EDITORS NOTE WITH ADMIRATION SAMMY LEE'S REBUTTAL TO AN ASIAN COMMUNIST, THE SECRETARY OF STATE'S DEMAND FOR TENNIS BRIEFING AND THE DESCENT OF 26 CALIFORNIA KELPS ON NEW YORK

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"I must tell you," said Eiler, "that we are having schedule trouble at Slippery Rock. Some schools in our section of the country are stubbornly resisting the trend. Carnegie Tech, Westminster, Thiel and Edinboro Teachers are dropping soccer and keeping the emphasis on football."

Spirits rose again as Al Wilson, a delegate from Yale University, got up and reported that a number of Connecticut high schools which had experimented with six-man football now had abandoned that and were concentrating on soccer. "I may say," he added, looking around carefully, "that parents in New Haven are pleased, very pleased, with soccer."

Now the wild look was back in the eyes of the delegates and soon Glenn F.H. Warner, soccer coach of the U.S. Naval Academy, was on his feet and roaring:

"I think we have doubled the number of college soccer teams! And I venture to say that there are at least 700 high schools playing soccer up and down the country today!"

Now the feeling was so intense that there was nothing in the world to do but play a game of soccer. And so the players were split up into two squads to represent the North and South. For the North, there were 13 players from Springfield, Mass., seven from Brooklyn College, seven from Courtland, three from West Point, two from City College, N.Y., one from Ithaca, N.Y. Bending the Mason-Dixon Line to even things, the South was represented by 18 players from Florida, seven from Navy, six from Pitt, four from Slippery Rock, three from Johns Hopkins, two from Swarthmore, and one each from Penn State and Duke.

The game was played at Stewart Field after being boldly advertised as "The Soccer Bowl." The South won, 4 to 2, but more important than that, $1,400 was taken in at the gate (with seats at $1 top) and the loot will be spent to make more training films, hold more soccer forums and do anything else that will further the cause of the booting game—and let the football devil take the hindmost.

Opening up the East

In its old age Manhattan has become quite an ant bed. Its industrious millions make their way through the subways and doorways and intersections of the big maze with treasured routine. Change the routine, inject a new note, and Manhattan on first impulse frowns and fears the worst. Those in power bark in protest to preserve the status quo: "Hey, Mac, what goes? Hey, Mac, you can't do that. Hey, Mac, I got orders positively no one is admitted without no ticket."

Last week into negative old Manhattan swirled a small but very positive collegiate crowd, bearing a potted palm and 10 cases of oranges and cheering loudly for the University of California at Los Angeles. UCLA, their alma mater, is best known in this New Year time for its top-ranked football team which did NOT play in the Rose Bowl. Undismayed that there was little to cheer about back home, 26 members of the "Kelps," UCLA's official rah-rah organization, came on to Manhattan to cheer their basketball team in Madison Square Garden against the best teams of the East.

Since the Kelps thrive on cheery disorganization (the members are no longer even sure why they bear a name as common as seaweed), it's a wonder they made it all the way. They left the campus in a cut-rate bus driven by two charitable Los Angeles police officers on a round-trip budget of $2,250—roughly what it would have cost them 100 years ago by Conestoga wagon.

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