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TALBERT SAYS THIS WAS CHALLENGE ROUND'S CRUCIAL POINT
William F. Talbert/U.S. Davis Cup Team Captain
January 10, 1955
Of all the points played in Sydney, the one diagrammed at right, says Bill Talbert, was the most decisive. It gave the U.S. a break in the opening match, and the subsequent lift which this break gave to the Americans was instrumental in carrying the team through to three straight victories to end Australia's hopes for a fifth consecutive Challenge Round triumph. This point was a big one for both sides. It came in the third set of the Hoad-Trabert match with the score one set each and Hoad, at set point on his service, leading 7-6 and 40-30. Each man needed the point desperately; Hoad to win the set—and Trabert to save it. The man who won the point would be only a set away from victory. The loser would be in grave danger. The atmosphere was electric as Lew stepped up to serve.
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January 10, 1955

Talbert Says This Was Challenge Round's Crucial Point

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Of all the points played in Sydney, the one diagrammed at right, says Bill Talbert, was the most decisive. It gave the U.S. a break in the opening match, and the subsequent lift which this break gave to the Americans was instrumental in carrying the team through to three straight victories to end Australia's hopes for a fifth consecutive Challenge Round triumph. This point was a big one for both sides. It came in the third set of the Hoad-Trabert match with the score one set each and Hoad, at set point on his service, leading 7-6 and 40-30. Each man needed the point desperately; Hoad to win the set—and Trabert to save it. The man who won the point would be only a set away from victory. The loser would be in grave danger. The atmosphere was electric as Lew stepped up to serve.

Hoad sent high-kicking delivery to Tony's backhand (1), then stormed up to the net. Trabert returned powerfully cross-court (2), also moved up—directly across net. Hoad was forced to hit a backhand volley which went to Trabert's backhand (3). Tony answered with a low volley down Hoad's forehand side (4). Lew stepped into it and cut loose with a stinging shot (5) aimed directly at his opponent. With both hands on racket, Tony stabbed blindly; ball fell weakly across net (6). Hoad, amazed by miracle shot, backhanded down line; ball was out by inches (7), giving Trabert the point—and the break he needed.

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