SI Vault
 
SOUNDTRACK
January 17, 1955
THE EDITORS CONSIDER THE LATEST TRIUMPH OF MAN (BASKETBALL DIVISION), THE WIRING OF FOOTBALL OFFICIALS FOR SOUND, AND THE RETURN OF BOXING'S SELF-EXPRESSIVE SUGAR RAY ROBINSON
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
January 17, 1955

Soundtrack

THE EDITORS CONSIDER THE LATEST TRIUMPH OF MAN (BASKETBALL DIVISION), THE WIRING OF FOOTBALL OFFICIALS FOR SOUND, AND THE RETURN OF BOXING'S SELF-EXPRESSIVE SUGAR RAY ROBINSON

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue
1 2 3 4 5

Phil Rizzuto up

Phil Rizzuto of the Yankees is performing as a television panelist these Friday evenings (DuMont network, 10:30 p.m. EST) on a program called Down You Go, one of the more pleasant and literate half hours around. And if you think Phil has been signed on (as some athletes have been by other show business enterprises) as a sort of staff boob, be advised that Phil is sharp as a tack, looking likewise and talking as though he had been hanging around Clifton Fadiman instead of Casey Stengel.

As caught last Friday evening, the Down You Go panel included Boris Karloff, the professional monster, and a couple of cuties named Signe Hasso and Patricia Cutts. None of them—not even Karloff—scared Phil. He went after the answers with as much style as he gives to the fielding of a ground ball.

Phil was first to guess that the phrase indicated by the clue, "very likely to happen to one who hasn't all his buttons," was "he lost his shirt." When the hint, "a Grimm character," was tossed out, Phil guessed, with logic if not accuracy, that the answer was "an umpire."

Although Phil didn't get "the U.S.S. Forrestal" as the answer to the phrase, "a great hardship," he was there in the clutch when Moderator Bergen Evans asked, "Can anyone tell us something about the Forrestal?"

"Biggest carrier in the world," said Phil promptly. "Too big to get through the Panama Canal. Displaces as much water as the city of Milwaukee drinks in a week."

Dr. Evans, a college professor, was plainly taken aback. "I didn't know that, Mr. Rizzuto," he said.

"It was in all the papers," said Phil Rizzuto kindly, in the gentle, tolerant manner of the well-informed man.

The student takes over

For 20 years before his death last summer John Blanks Campbell earned the respect of sports's most critical audience: the American racing fan and the thousands of men and women who help to make thoroughbred racing a billion-dollar business. In his capacity as racing secretary and handicap-per of the Jockey Club, John Campbell became most renowned for his uncanny ability to forecast what one season's two-year-olds would do during their three-year-old years. His long-time friend, the late Joe H. Palmer, once said of him, "He knows more in January what a horse will do in April than the average handicapper knows five minutes before post time."

Continue Story
1 2 3 4 5