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The Question: Should a race-horse owner run his horse for experience and not to win?
Jimmy Jemail
March 07, 1955
GENE LEONE, Restaurateur New York, N.Y. "Yes. A horse may be great in the morning and then freeze before a great crowd. He has to learn to run in competition before he can win. Alfred Vanderbilt tried to get some such rule, without success. The public would be told that a particular horse was running for experience, not to win."
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March 07, 1955

The Question: Should A Race-horse Owner Run His Horse For Experience And Not To Win?

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GENE LEONE, Restaurateur
New York, N.Y.
"Yes. A horse may be great in the morning and then freeze before a great crowd. He has to learn to run in competition before he can win. Alfred Vanderbilt tried to get some such rule, without success. The public would be told that a particular horse was running for experience, not to win."

NAT HERZFELD, Former Owner
Tropical Park
"No. If the public is not in on a deal, it's the greatest evil to sportsmen who support racing. Abusing a horse is the lesser of two evils. The trotters have an exhibition race for two-year-olds, for a small purse.
Why can't other tracks experiment with something like this?"

CURLEY HARRIS, Racing Editor
New York, N.Y.
"Yes. 'Qualifying' a horse is a necessary evil. All owners do it. There's no other way a green colt can learn to run in competition. Andy Crevolin's real crime was in publicly saying that such things are done. The tracks won't admit it because that would cut down the total take of the mutuels."

BILL CORUM, President
Churchill Downs
"It's a complex problem. A two-year-old can represent $100,000 when he first goes to the post. He is green and can easily be hurt. No one likes to see that much money go out the window. But I'm against 'qualifying' races, even though they have been the unwritten rule of horse racing for centuries."

BEN JONES, Trainer and Manager
Calumet Farms
"Jimmy, that's a tough question. Take a promising horse who had something wrong and didn't get his early form. Let's say he's a three-year-old. I don't believe in holding him, but he should be allowed to run on his own courage. If you push him to win you can easily ruin him."

ALFRED GWYNNE VANDERBILT, Owner and Breeder
President, World Veterans Fund, Inc.
"An owner should always try to win. Sometimes he might enter a horse without much hope of winning because the horse needs the competition and experience he can get in no other way. But the horse must be allowed to give his best effort so the public can realize his true form."

HARRY WISMER, Radio and TV Personality
New York, N.Y.
"Most stables do it. They won't say so because racing stewards oppose the practice. Only Andy Crevolin was brash enough to admit it. For his honesty, he was suspended. It is unfortunate if bets are placed on a horse that isn't running to win. But I've heard it said that you can't beat the races."

DR. CHARLES H. STRUB, Exec. Vice President, Santa Anita Park
"No. Suppose an owner instructs a jockey to run his horse just for experience. Some might bet on him, thinking he's running to win. That's dishonest. If an owner wants to run his horse for experience, he can enter him with instructions to let him run his best but not to punish him."

HARRY F. GUGGENHEIM, Owner and Breeder, Sands Point, L.I.
"I never run a horse unless I think he is able to win. But an occasional horse will not exert himself in training, no matter how much he is worked. We know he's good and believe he will exert himself in competition. So we enter him, believing he has a chance. Very often, he wins."

HIRSH JACOBS, Trainer
Isidor Bieber Stables
"It's true that a young horse is often raced for experience, but winning is important, too. Sometimes a couple of races are needed before a young horse gets into the winner's circle. Two-year-olds are hard to figure. But even though experience is necessary, I like it better when my horses finish in the money."

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