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19th HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
March 07, 1955
THE NTH DEGREE Sirs:I just received my February 14th issue of SI and by chance turned to the article concerning the Westminster Dog Show. The article and illustrations are typical of your magazine, in that it is complete to the nth degree. The chart on dog genealogy amazed me and made me realize all the more what a service your magazine is doing for the world of sport.
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March 07, 1955

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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THE NTH DEGREE
Sirs:
I just received my February 14th issue of SI and by chance turned to the article concerning the Westminster Dog Show. The article and illustrations are typical of your magazine, in that it is complete to the nth degree. The chart on dog genealogy amazed me and made me realize all the more what a service your magazine is doing for the world of sport.

I want you to know that I, and many others, fully appreciate your efforts, although we do not write letters every week.
GEORGE E. JENSEN
Sports Editor
Record-Searchlight
Redding, Calif.

HE GOES AS IS
Sirs:
First of all I want to congratulate you on your very fine article on the Westminster Show and the "ins and outs" of dog shows, handlers and what have you. I enjoyed it immensely and I think the non-doggy and slightly-doggy public will find it most entertaining and informative.

I have a bone to pick with you and/or Mr. Arthur Singer. In the chart showing the genealogy there is a picture of a little dog below which the name "Miniature Pinscher" appears. The dog pictured is a Toy Manchester Terrier, of which there can be no doubt, as the Miniature Pinscher has both cropped ears and a docked tail. I have nothing against the little Pinschers, thinking they are a very handsome little dog, but a Toy Manchester goes "as is" and no mutilation is necessary to make him the smart-looking dog that he is. My Toy Manchester Terrier, Ch. Whisky Neat of Bum-met Brook, placed best of opposite sex last year.
RUTH TAFT HOBBS
Shrewsbury, Mass.

WHERE IS THAT NATIVE?
Sirs:
I like SI, but you can imagine how I felt this month after searching through your dog chart and not being able to find a picture of the American Water Spaniel. The oldest breed of hunting dog in America, one of only two in the whole sporting group that was developed here in the U.S.A., a true native. I breed and hunt with these dogs and also have shown in a lot of shows. Have at this time a male and a female that I campaigned to their championship in 1954. These dogs have been bred pure for over 50 years.
S. V. HANON
Delafield, Wis.

A TRIBUTE
Sirs:
I certainly enjoyed Mr. Wells's dog show coverage, though I myself happen to be a cat man. His name is Bo Bo (see cut) and I had him long before Mr. Rockefeller had his Bobo. Not near the expense either. Tried once to establish some sort of family lineage for him. Figured he had the swagger of Fuzzy Freddie from Frelinghuysen's Ferry and the glare of Goggle-eyed Gertie from Gillicuddy Gulch, so thought it best to keep things in the family. End of ancestry research, but beginning A Tribute: to that great All-American thoroughbred, the alley cat, with both grandparents from the wrong side of the tracks and from whom America's children have learned their first lessons in love, tolerance, ownership and the facts of life.
L. S. MONTGOMERY
Jacksonville, Fla.

EXTRA
Sirs:
Another whistle kettle to SI! Cricket, like opera, is a rum sport and P. Gallico gave it delightful innings!

Herewith a few "extras" you may like to add to an already fine score.

The Cincinnati Red Stockings of 1860 (beginnings of organized ball) "developed" from the city's cricket club, which, with San Francisco, Detroit and Chicago, constituted the strongholds of western cricket.

The romantic history of baseball is epitomized for glamour and personality almost solely by the great Babe. English cricket, past and present, is similarly served by W. G. Grace (W.G., "the grace of God"), a qualified physician whose great beard blew through nearly 50 years of English cricket; Ranji, the Indian prince, whose late move at the wicket was faster than that of a mongoose; and that most felicitous and estimable of sports historians, Neville Cardus, who, incidentally, is music critic for the Manchester Guardian.

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