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THE AUGUSTA NATIONAL A HOLE-BY-HOLE STUDY
Herbert Warren Wind
April 04, 1955
Each of the 18 holes of the Augusta National Golf Course bears the name of the predominant flower, shrub or tree that fringes its fairway or green area. Contrary to legend, none of the holes is a copy of a famous predecessor in Great Britain or the United States. In planning them, Bob Jones attempted to duplicate only the general spirit of the great courses he had played, and the design of each hole springs from the natural features of the terrain—depicted in these charts with the contour lines (indicating the rise and fall of the land) set at 10-foot gradations. There are few golfers, pro or amateur, who do not consider the Masters course that Jones built the sturdiest and most provocative test of championship golf in the country.
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April 04, 1955

The Augusta National A Hole-by-hole Study

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Each of the 18 holes of the Augusta National Golf Course bears the name of the predominant flower, shrub or tree that fringes its fairway or green area. Contrary to legend, none of the holes is a copy of a famous predecessor in Great Britain or the United States. In planning them, Bob Jones attempted to duplicate only the general spirit of the great courses he had played, and the design of each hole springs from the natural features of the terrain—depicted in these charts with the contour lines (indicating the rise and fall of the land) set at 10-foot gradations. There are few golfers, pro or amateur, who do not consider the Masters course that Jones built the sturdiest and most provocative test of championship golf in the country.

White Pine: 1. 400 YARDS PAR FOUR. Requires a fairly accurate drive and a fairly accurate second but is not too demanding. Excellent warm-up hole for both expert and duffer.

Woodbine: 2. 555 YARDS PAR FIE. Can be reached in two some days by an extremely long hitter. A well placed second will set up possible birdie for average pro. Green is trickier than it looks, replete with disturbingly subtle breaks.

Flowering Peach: 3. 355 YARDS PAR FOUR. A Scottish-type drive-and-pitch hole that requires a perfectly gauged second. For all of its shortness, this is a tough nut and one of the most unyielding pars.

Palm: 4. 220 YARDS PAR THREE. Key hazard is Redan-type trap at front center of elevated green.

Magnolia: 5. 450 YARDS PAR FOUR. A very rough customer that usually calls for a drive and a long iron, sometimes a wood. On the severely contoured green, Snead once misstroked putt from 45 feet and ended up 50 feet away. Sank it.

Juniper: 6. 190 YARDS PAR THREE. Patton started his spectacular rush in 1954 by holing fie-iron here.

Pampas: 7. 365 YARDS PAR FOUR. The nest of traps around the small green puts the premium on a long drive that sets up a comfortable pitch. Most players are entirely happy to settle for their par.

Yellow Jasmine: 8. 520 YARDS PAR FIE. Uphill all the way to a sharply mounded punch-bowl green. When pin is situated at back of the green, approach shot must be placed perfectly for player to successfully get down in two.

Carolina Cherry: 9. 420 YARDS PAR FOUR. Approach to plateau green often must be played from downhill lie. In doubt, keep right.

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