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EVENTS & DISCOVERIES
May 30, 1955
Heavyweight perspectives, Williams vs. Snead Leadfoot Trophy, Schweinberger's vaccination, Muskellunge psychology, Model basin at work
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May 30, 1955

Events & Discoveries

Heavyweight perspectives, Williams vs. Snead Leadfoot Trophy, Schweinberger's vaccination, Muskellunge psychology, Model basin at work

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Later one of the German players, Center Half Guenther Baumann, a tall, spare man of 34 with high cheekbones and high forehead, called upon his English learned as a prisoner of war and spoke of various soccer techniques.

"In Germany," he said, "soccer is played more for the eye, more letting the ball do the work. In England, it is more the long-passing game, less for the eye, more for the scoring chance at all times. Here in the United States—"

Herr Baumann spread his hands and smiled apologetically.

"Here in this country," he went on, "it is more the individual, less the team, more kick and rush, more that everybody tries to play first fiddle."

Sunderland was undefeated on its U.S. tour, but Nuremberg, astonishingly, was beaten, 3 to 2, by the Kutis team of St. Louis. Kutis, unlike many eastern U.S. teams, is strictly a native product. How was the Kutis victory to be explained?

"We were simply outhustled," said Nuremberg's famous coach, Franz (Bimbo) Binder, Austria's greatest player for 15 years. This drew a quick dissent from one of the younger Nuremberg players, 24-year-old Guenther Glomb. "We were playing against 14 men!" he cried. "Eleven players, two linesmen and a referee. Every decision went against us. Besides we had only three hours sleep the night before!" He kicked at a bench. "Also," he said, "what a soccer field—full of lumps!"

Between exhibitions, both English and German players had a wonderful time. The British went to the top of the Empire State Building, saw the Yankees play ball, sampled all the brands of ale available in Times Square. The Germans gorged on sauerbraten and sausages in Yorkville, New York's German section, and inspected a total of seven breweries between New York and St. Louis.

Only one player, Walter Schweinberger, a young Nuremberg reserve, had one really bad time. En route to a game in Kearny, N.J., he was riding in a car with Max Morlock. As the car neared the Holland Tunnel under the Hudson, Morlock suddenly asked:

"Schweinberger, you got your vaccination papers?"

Schweinberger paled at the mention of papers.

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