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CURRENT WEEK & WHAT'S AHEAD
May 30, 1955
Big league baseball standings began to take on a more familiar look. The New York Yankees and the Cleveland Indians commanded the American League, a game or so apart. The World Champion New York Giants climbed to second, in a good spot to haunt the Dodgers.
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May 30, 1955

Current Week & What's Ahead

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Big league baseball standings began to take on a more familiar look. The New York Yankees and the Cleveland Indians commanded the American League, a game or so apart. The World Champion New York Giants climbed to second, in a good spot to haunt the Dodgers.

U.S. amateur golfers won the Walker Cup for the 14th time in 15 tries with an embarrassingly lopsided 10-2 victory over the British at St. Andrews, Scotland.

Nashua was left almost unchallenged in this week's Preakness at Pimlico when both Summer Tan and Dedicate, his most impressive Eastern rivals, were pulled out to rest for the Belmont Stakes on June 11.

Miler Wes Santee startled track fans by entering the half mile at Modesto's California Relays—held only 24 hours after he had failed, with a 4:05.5 race, to better four minutes at the Coliseum Relays in Los Angeles. He ran the second fastest 880 in history, beat California's Lon Spurrier (whose 1:47.5, run three weeks ago, is the fastest) and broke Mai Whitfield's outmoded but still official world record of 1:48.6 by a tenth of a second.

Two other world records also fell at Modesto: Franklin (Bud) Held of San Francisco's Olympic Club threw the javelin 268 feet 2� inches, and the University of Texas 440-yard relay team ran their event in 40.2, cutting .3 off the University of Southern California's previous record.

Because Lloyds of London is willing to bet against the luck and accuracy of Pacific Coast League hitters, a 3�-inch "knot-hole" has been bored in the left center-field fence at Seattle Stadium, home of the Seattle Rainiers—any hitter who drives a baseball through the hole (11� feet above ground and 360 feet from home plate) gets $100,000.

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