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Especially for the middle and high handicap golfers
Joe Novak
June 06, 1955
I have rarely seen a consistently good golfer who did not have excellent balance. The feet, of course, are the key to balance or the lack of it. In addressing the ball, many golfers stand with their feet planted so that both toes point outward. This position tends to root them too solidly. It doesn't allow them to transfer their weight smoothly and easily going back and coming into the ball, and the player has quite a time of it getting his body into the position whereby it can properly transmit its power to the swing via the hands.
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June 06, 1955

Especially For The Middle And High Handicap Golfers

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I have rarely seen a consistently good golfer who did not have excellent balance. The feet, of course, are the key to balance or the lack of it. In addressing the ball, many golfers stand with their feet planted so that both toes point outward. This position tends to root them too solidly. It doesn't allow them to transfer their weight smoothly and easily going back and coming into the ball, and the player has quite a time of it getting his body into the position whereby it can properly transmit its power to the swing via the hands.

The next time you go out to play or practice, try this tip. Take a slightly narrow stance. Then after you have lined up the shot, swivel your right heel out so that the toe points straight ahead or even a fraction in. This pigeon-toed stance, you'll find, will enable you to pivot with greater ease on your backswing. The whole right foot, not just the heel, will support the shifting of your weight. You will find, in short, that this pigeon-toed stance will facilitate the maintenance of balance throughout the swing and that you will be able to move into the ball with greater power and so gain extra length.

From JOE NOVAK, pro at Bel Air Country Club, Beverly Hills, Calif.

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