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'THE OUTLAWED SPITBALL WAS MY MONEY PITCH'
Dick Young
July 04, 1955
The retired Dodger hero admits he threw a "wet one" and tells how other players like Campanella, Reese and Hodges of his own team and Durocher, Maglie and Sewell of the enemy reacted to it
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July 04, 1955

'the Outlawed Spitball Was My Money Pitch'

The retired Dodger hero admits he threw a "wet one" and tells how other players like Campanella, Reese and Hodges of his own team and Durocher, Maglie and Sewell of the enemy reacted to it

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" 'I was trying to tell you that you weren't playing those guys high enough.' "

Roe chuckled, unperturbed by this ignominious memory.

"Another little thing I discovered," he said, "the spitter works better in warm weather. It seems to dry up quicker when it's cool.

"I never told any of these little things to the rest of the Dodgers, because I figured someday they might be traded, or maybe I would be, and then I'd get caught.

"No, I take that back; I did tell one man—my roomie, Billy Cox. We got about as close as two fellows can get, I guess, Billy and me, and there wasn't much we didn't know about each other.

"One night, while we were reading in bed, Billy put his paper down and said suddenly:

" 'Roomie, suppose they sell me. You gonna throw it to me?'

" 'What are you talking about?'

" 'You know damned well what I'm talking about,' he said. 'You gonna throw it to me?'

" 'You're darned right I am.'

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