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MERCEDES INTRODUCES A NEW NOTE OF CAUTION IN THE DUTCH GRAND PRIX AS ITS GREAT FANGIO-MOSS DUO CONTINUES TO DOMINATE THE CIRCUIT
John Bentley
July 04, 1955
The last time I visited the little Dutch resort town of Zandvoort its scrubby dunes were a maze of concrete pillboxes, a tangle of barbed wire left by the departing Wehrmacht. But that was 10 years ago. On Sunday, June 19, 1955, the sands had been cleared and a beautiful 2.6-mile race course laid out through the hilly dunes. The occasion was the fifth Dutch International Grand Prix. Some 50,000 people were clustered over the dunes.
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July 04, 1955

Mercedes Introduces A New Note Of Caution In The Dutch Grand Prix As Its Great Fangio-moss Duo Continues To Dominate The Circuit

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The checkered flag finally dipped on Fangio and Moss, a car-length apart; then on the Maseratis of Musso (54 seconds later) and Mieres; on Eugenio Castellotti's Ferrari and Behra's Maserati, three laps behind; on Hawthorn's Ferrari with a five-lap deficit; on Da Silva Ramos' Gordini No. 22, and independent Veteran Louis Rosier's blue Maserati, seven laps astern; Jacques Pollet's Gordini No. 24, trailing the leaders by eight laps; lastly on Johnny Claes in a yellow Ferrari, touring around 12 laps back. No one was surprised that Fangio had set a new record average of 90.16 mph for the Dutch Grand Prix.

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