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DETROIT STEALS SEATTLE'S PRIDE
Paul O'Neil
August 15, 1955
Joe Schoenith's 'Gale V' won speedboating's prized Gold Cup last Sunday—not because she was the fastest boat in the race but because the Detroiters hatched a plan to beat all rivals
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August 15, 1955

Detroit Steals Seattle's Pride

Joe Schoenith's 'Gale V' won speedboating's prized Gold Cup last Sunday—not because she was the fastest boat in the race but because the Detroiters hatched a plan to beat all rivals

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Miss Thriftway, off to a bad start and last in the field of six, began one of the most amazing stern chases in Gold Cup history. Driver Bill Muncey threw her past Breathless, Miss Cadillac and Gale V and was challenging Such Crust for second after little more than a lap and a half. He did not get past—Such Crust bounced wide on every turn. But he stayed close, so close that he hid in the spray of Such Crust's rooster tail to keep Such Crust's Driver Kade from knowing his exact position. Finally, on the fifth lap, Kade came up behind slow-running Breathless and Muncey tore out of hiding, gunned past both and set out for Slo-Mo. "I hid in his tail too," he said afterward. "I figured Taggart wouldn't know I'd passed Crust and wouldn't be expecting anything. Then I went out and passed him—I saw him look over at me and really jump. Well, he stood on the throttle to pull her up and his engine caught fire."

That was the end of the boat race—Slo-Mo went dead in the water as Taggart worked with a fire extinguisher and Muncey took the checkered flag, waving jubilantly to the applauding tens of thousands on shore.

He cut his engine, drifted slowly to the crowded official barge, and climbed out—to weep, to embrace his pretty wife, to be mobbed by his maintenance crew, to be cheered, photographed, thrown into the lake and even—ah, stern and trying moment—to be kissed by ex-Heavyweight Champion Max Baer. But Such Crust's delaying tactics had cost him precious seconds. An hour later, after most of the crowd had gone home certain that he had won, the timers announced the official winner.

"You did it, Jack," cried jubilant Detroiters as Bakery Man Schafer received the news. "Thank you," said Jack. "Thank you." He smiled broadly. After a moment he smiled again.

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