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19th HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
August 15, 1955
YES, THIS WAS IT Sirs: SI's conversation with Mr. Williams (Aug. 1) was a memorable one. I suppose more has been written about this man than about the atom bomb, but this was the Ted Williams story. It is incredible that with so much said about him we have not had something like this long ago; but then it is so easy, isn't it, to flay the dead horse of Williams' non-cooperation with those who mill around the baseball parks and never bother to dig a little to get at the real Williams. Yes, this was the Ted Williams story and I'm mighty pleased to have read it.WALT FLANIGAN Boston
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August 15, 1955

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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OLD DISH, NEW FLAVOR
Sirs:
Wonder how many letters from how many people wondering not how big but how stale a "Fish Story" (SI, Aug. 1) can get. That dish has been served around these parts so long it actually has a fishy odor. But, you know, with SI's particular flavoring even the old ones come out right tasty.

Each issue brings further proof that you fellows have lapped the field in this sport-writing business.
J. ERNEST ROBERTS
Burlington, N.C.

?Happily, a lot of SI readers appreciated Chicago's vintage fish story.—ED.

BEST IN THE BUSINESS
Sirs:
The story on George May (SI, Aug. 1) doesn't begin to give him credit for making professional golf a going concern; his annual world championship tournament is the biggest thing—and the best thing—in the business, and none of your innuendo can change it. "A brass band at a church picnic," indeed!
PETER HANSHAW
New Orleans

WHY ALL THE FUSS?
Sirs:
Come, come, gentlemen! Why all the fuss about George May? As I see it, the USGA's cold shoulder is just the opposite of what May deserves for his leadership in making golf a top U.S. sport for players and spectators alike. Who else has done so much for the game? I say more power to him—five Cadillacs, 13 bars, 65 sports shirts and all!
JOHN SCOTT
Lawrence, Wis.

THAT MAN
Sirs:
George May's place in American golf is secure. He is the promoter of some of the biggest tournaments in the game. He has brought the game to thousands who never before knew the difference between a tee and a caddy. George May, above all, has clean hands. He has never, ever, as far as anyone knows, tampered with golfers or tournaments.

I am no admirer of the man's methods or motives. Certainly May is not an admirable character, except to those who automatically equate five Cadillacs with virtue. But that is no reason, no reason at all, to discredit May's perfectly honest attempts to promote the game of golf. Believe me spending the money he has, he could have made a far better business promotion out of any other sport or any other facet of our public life.
GEORGE JENKINS
Indianapolis

BUSINESS METHODS IN GOLF
Sirs:
I was pleased to see the courageous expos� of George S. May in your August 1 issue; despite his profitable proof that business methods can do a lot toward making golf well-known, there is something abhorrent to me about making any sport so gaudily and vulgarly the creature of the dollar.

After all, sports are an American institution—sports in which the sole object is the relaxation and enjoyment of the participant.

Regrettably, we have seen a tendency toward professionalism and vicarious spectator "participation" in athletics—a growing trend which has long been apparent in collegiate football, in the travesty upon wrestling which is ground out for the television cameras, in the boxing deals of the Carbos and the D'Antonis. Now we see it in the moneyed monkeyshines of Mr. May, who has apparently dealt in golf courses, slot machines and Bibles—all with the same green-coated object.

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