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IT WAS ONLY AN INCIDENT, BUT IT SHOULD BE A WARNING TO WILLIE MAYS: HE CAN MAKE OR BREAK HIMSELF AS A BIG STAR
Robert Creamer
August 29, 1955
Willie Mays declined to run after a ball last week and in so doing (or not doing) stirred up a nice little hornets' nest.
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August 29, 1955

It Was Only An Incident, But It Should Be A Warning To Willie Mays: He Can Make Or Break Himself As A Big Star

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This year, for reasons not entirely clear—whether because of weariness brought on by too much baseball, or indifference brought on by a one-sided pennant race, or disdain brought on by a too appreciative evaluation of his own worth—W. Mays, outfielder, just doesn't do things like that any more.

It's a shame, too, because it wasn't Willie's .345 average, his 42 home runs, his great catches, that made him the most treasured ballplayer in the country. It was the way he played, with that wild, boyish abandon. He never cheated the demanding baseball fan. He gave everything. When he gives up now, even on a hopeless quest, he isn't the same Mays.

I suspect this Mays would never have caught the ball that Vic Wertz hit in the World Series. He'd know he couldn't get to it.

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