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THE BABE BOWS OUT
Robert L. Slevin
August 29, 1955
The once great Ruth, eyes and bat failing in 1935, for a day showed fans he was still Sultan of Swat
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August 29, 1955

The Babe Bows Out

The once great Ruth, eyes and bat failing in 1935, for a day showed fans he was still Sultan of Swat

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In the third the big fellow came up with Les Mallon on and the ex-Cub work horse, Guy Bush, working for the Pirates. Bush, unperturbed by the fate of his predecessor, wound up and fired away. The Bam wound up and whacked the ball on top of the right field stands and trotted around the bases. The roaring tribute of the unbelieving fans was a gratifying sound.

In the fifth inning the situation was the same, with Mallon waiting on base for a lift home. It was a moral victory for the Pittsburgh hurler that he held the Babe to a single, although he did drive in his fifth run.

By the time the seventh had rolled around, the Braves were behind in spite of Ruth's heroic stickwork. Bush fired one down the middle. The Babe brought his bat around from behind his left ear and sent a towering shot high over the wall into Schenley Park for the longest drive they had ever seen in Pittsburgh. The shattered Bush was led away and given a hot shower to soothe his nerves, Waite Hoyt finishing for the Bucs.

Ruth, with three homers, a single and six runs batted in, quit in the seventh; the fans rose and gave him an ovation that stopped the game.

Eight days later, on June 2, bone-weary and embittered, baseball's greatest player retired from the game.

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