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WINNING STRATEGY: A MASTERFUL RIDE
Whitney Tower
September 12, 1955
After close study of the official patrol films of the match race, Artist C. W. Anderson, renowned horse specialist, reconstructs the crucial moments in one of Arcaro's finest racing triumphs
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September 12, 1955

Winning Strategy: A Masterful Ride

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After close study of the official patrol films of the match race, Artist C. W. Anderson, renowned horse specialist, reconstructs the crucial moments in one of Arcaro's finest racing triumphs

THE START: Nashua drew the inside post position which, on this day, was actually stall No. 2. Following Trainer Fitzsimmons' orders, "Run from the jump," Jockey Eddie Arcaro propelled his horse from the stall like a rocket (drawing 1). With whip in full and powerful play, Arcaro avoided the muddy going on the rail, made instead for the solid running surface stretching in front of the vacant third stall. A split second later Willie Shoemaker, already outbroken, tried nevertheless to guide Swaps to the same desirable strip. It was too late, and drawing 2 shows how, after nearly brushing Nashua in the first few strides, Shoemaker was forced to rein Swaps sharply to his right to get him across muddy going and into an adjacent firm path. The maneuver, which looked almost like a falter, cost Swaps valuable time in his bid to be out in front going into the first turn.

THE CLUBHOUSE TURN: A veteran of many miles around the tight turns of his home track at Aqueduct, Nashua felt at home at Chicago's Washington Park. On the first turn Swaps made a run at him, but Arcaro, still avoiding the mud by the rail, chose to run wide. In so doing he skillfully forced Swaps to run wider yet.

ON THE BACKSTRETCH: Still leading and setting the fast pace as ordered, Nashua covered the first six furlongs in 1:10 2/5. Swaps made his second run at Nashua in the backstretch, but it is failing here. His final bid came moments later on the far turn and likewise failed. Said Shoemaker afterward: "My horse had no reserve."

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