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19th HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
September 12, 1955
MR. HORLICK, MEET MR. FAUNCE Sirs:I was greatly amused to receive recently this letter (see below) from the secretary of my country club. Obviously it is not at all funny in itself, but it did remind me so very much of J. P. Marquand's Happy Knoll series and especially of his article Breakage at Happy Knoll . If I remember correctly, "spirited youths" at Happy Knoll's coming-out party committed almost identical mayhem to its golf course. I only hope that I won't be dunned for the damage as were Happy Knoll's members.NAME WITHHELDRye, New York
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September 12, 1955

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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But, had you run only The Great Game of Tennis by Prime Minister Menzies, my favorite sport would have been well served. The gain of the world of government has obviously been at the expense of the world of journalism. Though Writer Menzies' finger was gentle, it hit with deadly precision the fallacies and weaknesses we have allowed to creep into this one truly international game—the hypocritical amateurism to which we cling, the foolishness of thrusting immature youths into national and international competition (last year we had a 13-year-old national champion) and the brashness of those who claim that today's players of the Power Serve and the Constant Net Play could match the all-round perfection of the great players of the 1920s. Yet he also pointed out the potential value of this game in a world of international tensions. It is a deeply thoughtful article, one not easily forgotten by anyone interested in tennis and its future.
T. MALCOLM PURCELL JR.
Thomson, Ga.

AUSTRALIA'S LUCK
Sirs:
It's a long time since I've been so touched and moved by an article on sports as I was by Prime Minister Menzies' thought-provoking comments on world tennis.

This was a completely honest and searching look at tennis today and yesterday from the deeply personal viewpoint of a man who by his words stamps himself a true sportsman and gentleman.

I can't help but think how lucky Australia is to have this man at her helm. His command of the language, his admirable ability to express himself and his broad and understanding outlook remind one strongly of another great prime minister.

This was another "first" of which SI can be justifiably proud. Congratulations from a reader who never intended to write!
HAWLEY T. CHESTER JR.
Greenwich, Conn.

A RECOMMENDATION
Sirs:
If Tony Trabert doesn't take a pro job ("If I turned pro I might be able to put $60,000 or $70,000 in the bank....") I'd like to recommend him for sports editor of the old Literary Digest. He has all the qualifications ("I think we'll retain the Davis Cup...clinch it in the first two days").
FRANK A. LAWRENCE
Indiana, Pa.

WHERE?
Sirs:
In your issue for Aug. 29 you have an article on the Blue Jay sailboat.

Please tell me where one can purchase the kit shown in your story.
R. B. DAVIES
Alma, Mich.

?For Mr. Davies' information, and that of a score of other readers: Robert Sparkman, whose company created the Blue Jay, is secretary of the class. He can be reached c/o Sparkman & Stephens, 11 East 44th St., New York 17, N.Y. Both kits and finished boats are available from Robert McKean, 180 East Prospect Ave., Mamaroneck, N.Y. and from Dick Jackson, Island City Boat Co., 2317 Buena Vista Avenue, Alameda, Calif. Finished boats only are offered by the Saybrook Yacht Yard in Old Lyme, Conn.—ED.

BUT FOR THE GRACE OF SMITH...
Sirs:
Edmund Ware Smith, whose fine literary piece of writing entitled Mr. Smith Meets the President (SI, Aug. 29) portrayed to me something in writing in which less fortunate mortals have failed unknowingly. Here was all the fine sensitive feeling of a meeting most of us harbor secretly! It also could have read Mr. Eddinger Meets the President.
LOUIS EDDINGER
Kannapolis, N.C.

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